ICD-10-CM Code D10.3

Benign neoplasm of other and unspecified parts of mouth

Version 2021 Non-Billable Code

Not Valid for Submission

D10.3 is a "header" nonspecific and non-billable code code, consider using a code with a higher level of specificity for a diagnosis of benign neoplasm of other and unspecified parts of mouth. The code is NOT valid for the year 2021 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions.

ICD-10:D10.3
Short Description:Benign neoplasm of other and unspecified parts of mouth
Long Description:Benign neoplasm of other and unspecified parts of mouth

Consider the following ICD-10 codes with a higher level of specificity:

  • D10.30 - Benign neoplasm of unspecified part of mouth
  • D10.39 - Benign neoplasm of other parts of mouth

Code Classification

  • Neoplasms (C00–D48)
    • Benign neoplasms, except benign neuroendocrine tumors (D10-D36)
      • Benign neoplasm of mouth and pharynx (D10)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020
  • FY 2021 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2020 through 9/30/2021

Information for Patients


Benign Tumors

Also called: Benign neoplasms, Noncancerous tumors

Tumors are abnormal growths in your body. They can be either benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer. Malignant ones are. Benign tumors grow only in one place. They cannot spread or invade other parts of your body. Even so, they can be dangerous if they press on vital organs, such as your brain.

Tumors are made up of extra cells. Normally, cells grow and divide to form new cells as your body needs them. When cells grow old, they die, and new cells take their place. Sometimes, this process goes wrong. New cells form when your body does not need them, and old cells do not die when they should. These extra cells can divide without stopping and may form tumor.

Treatment often involves surgery. Benign tumors usually don't grow back.

NIH: National Cancer Institute

  • Biopsy - polyps (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Cherry angioma (Medical Encyclopedia)

[Learn More]

Mouth Disorders

Your mouth is one of the most important parts of your body. It has many different functions. It allows you to

  • Take in food and drink
  • Breathe in air
  • Start digestion, with your teeth chewing the food you eat and your salivary glands releasing saliva to help break down the food
  • Speak and sing
  • Show emotion, by smiling or pouting

Any problem that affects your mouth can make it hard to eat, drink, or even smile. Some common mouth problems include

  • Cold sores - painful sores on the lips and around the mouth, caused by a virus
  • Canker sores - painful sores in the mouth, caused by bacteria or viruses
  • Thrush - a yeast infection that causes white patches in your mouth
  • Leukoplakia - white patches of excess cell growth on the cheeks, gums or tongue, common in smokers
  • Dry mouth - a lack of enough saliva, caused by some medicines and certain diseases
  • Gum or tooth problems
  • Bad breath

Treatment for mouth disorders varies, depending on the problem. If a mouth problem is caused by some other disease, treating that disease can help. It is also important to keep your mouth clean and healthy by brushing, flossing, and not using tobacco.

  • Drooling (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Gum biopsy (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Herpangina (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Leukoplakia (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Lichen planus (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Mouth sores (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Mouth ulcers (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Mucous cyst (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Perioral dermatitis (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Thrush (Medical Encyclopedia)

[Learn More]