ICD-10-CM Code D03.12

Melanoma in situ of left eyelid, including canthus

Version 2020 Replaced Code Non-Billable Code

Not Valid for Submission

D03.12 is a "header" nonspecific and non-billable code code, consider using a code with a higher level of specificity for a diagnosis of melanoma in situ of left eyelid, including canthus. The code is NOT valid for the year 2020 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions.

ICD-10:D03.12
Short Description:Melanoma in situ of left eyelid, including canthus
Long Description:Melanoma in situ of left eyelid, including canthus

Consider the following ICD-10 codes with a higher level of specificity:

  • D03.121 - Melanoma in situ of left upper eyelid, including canthus
  • D03.122 - Melanoma in situ of left lower eyelid, including canthus

Replaced Code

This code was replaced in the 2020 ICD-10 code set with the code(s) listed below. The National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) has published an update to the ICD-10-CM diagnosis codes which became effective October 1, 2019. This code was replaced for the FY 2020 (October 1, 2019 - September 30, 2020).

  • D03.121 - Melanoma in situ of left upper eyelid, including canthus
  • D03.122 - Melanoma in situ of left lower eyelid, including canthus

Convert D03.12 to ICD-9

  • 172.1 - Malig melanoma eyelid (Approximate Flag)

Code Classification

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - Code Deleted, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020

Information for Patients


Melanoma

Melanoma is the most serious type of skin cancer. Often the first sign of melanoma is a change in the size, shape, color, or feel of a mole. Most melanomas have a black or black-blue area. Melanoma may also appear as a new mole. It may be black, abnormal, or "ugly looking."

Thinking of "ABCDE" can help you remember what to watch for:

  • Asymmetry - the shape of one half does not match the other
  • Border - the edges are ragged, blurred or irregular
  • Color - the color is uneven and may include shades of black, brown and tan
  • Diameter - there is a change in size, usually an increase
  • Evolving - the mole has changed over the past few weeks or months

Surgery is the first treatment of all stages of melanoma. Other treatments include chemotherapy and radiation, biologic, and targeted therapies. Biologic therapy boosts your body's own ability to fight cancer. Targeted therapy uses substances that attack cancer cells without harming normal cells.

NIH: National Cancer Institute


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