C79.60 - Secondary malignant neoplasm of unspecified ovary

Version 2023
ICD-10:C79.60
Short Description:Secondary malignant neoplasm of unspecified ovary
Long Description:Secondary malignant neoplasm of unspecified ovary
Status: Valid for Submission
Version:ICD-10-CM 2023
Code Classification:
  • Neoplasms (C00–D48)
    • Malignant neoplasms of ill-defined, other secondary and unspecified sites (C76-C80)
      • Secondary malignant neoplasm of other and unspecified sites (C79)

C79.60 is a billable ICD-10 code used to specify a medical diagnosis of secondary malignant neoplasm of unspecified ovary. The code is valid during the fiscal year 2023 from October 01, 2022 through September 30, 2023 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions.

This code is applicable to female patients only. It is clinically and virtually impossible to use this code on a non-female patient.

The following anatomical sites found in the Table of Neoplasms reference the parent code C79.6 of the current diagnosis code given the correct histological behavior: Neoplasm, neoplastic corpus or Neoplasm, neoplastic corpus albicans or Neoplasm, neoplastic ovary .

Unspecified diagnosis codes like C79.60 are acceptable when clinical information is unknown or not available about a particular condition. Although a more specific code is preferable, unspecified codes should be used when such codes most accurately reflect what is known about a patient's condition. Specific diagnosis codes should not be used if not supported by the patient's medical record.

Approximate Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms or lay terms that might be used to identify the correct diagnosis code:

Clinical Information

Code Edits

The Medicare Code Editor (MCE) detects and reports errors in the coding of claims data. The following ICD-10 Code Edits are applicable to this code:

Convert to ICD-9 Code

Source ICD-10 CodeTarget ICD-9 Code
C79.60198.6 - Second malig neo ovary
Approximate Flag - The approximate mapping means there is not an exact match between the ICD-10 and ICD-9 codes and the mapped code is not a precise representation of the original code.

Table of Neoplasms

The parent code C79.6 of the current diagnosis code is referenced in the table of neoplasms by anatomical site. For each site there are six possible code numbers according to whether the neoplasm in question is malignant, benign, in situ, of uncertain behavior, or of unspecified nature. The description of the neoplasm will often indicate which of the six columns is appropriate.

Where such descriptors are not present, the remainder of the Index should be consulted where guidance is given to the appropriate column for each morphological (histological) variety listed. However, the guidance in the Index can be overridden if one of the descriptors mentioned above is present.

Neoplasm, neoplastic Malignant
Primary
Malignant
Secondary
CaInSitu Benign Uncertain
Behavior
Unspecified
Behavior
»Neoplasm, neoplastic
  »corpus
C56.C79.6D07.39D27.D39.1D49.59
»Neoplasm, neoplastic
  »corpus
    »albicans
C56.C79.6D07.39D27.D39.1D49.59
»Neoplasm, neoplastic
  »ovary
C56.C79.6D07.39D27.D39.1D49.59

Patient Education


Ovarian Cancer

What is ovarian cancer?

Cancer is a disease in which abnormal cells in the body grow out of control and form a tumor. Ovarian cancer is a cancerous tumor that forms in the tissues of an ovary. The ovaries are a pair of female reproductive glands that make eggs and female hormones.

What are the types of ovarian cancer?

There are a few different types of ovarian cancer. The most common type is epithelial cancer. It begins in the cells that cover the ovary.

There are also two related types of epithelial cancer that can spread to the ovaries:

These two cancers are similar to ovarian cancer, and they have the same treatments. So some medical experts also consider those two types as ovarian cancer.

Some other rarer types of ovarian cancer are malignant germ cell tumors and stromal tumors.

What causes ovarian cancer?

Ovarian cancer happens when there are changes (mutations) in the genetic material (DNA). Often, the exact cause of these genetic changes is unknown.

Most ovarian cancers are caused by genetic changes that happen during your lifetime. But sometimes these genetic changes are inherited, meaning that you are born with them. Ovarian cancer that is caused by inherited genetic changes is called hereditary ovarian cancer.

There are also certain genetic changes that can raise your risk of ovarian cancer, including changes called BRCA1 and BRCA2. These two changes also raise your risk of breast and other cancers.

Besides genetics, your lifestyle and the environment can affect your risk of ovarian cancer.

Who is more likely to develop ovarian cancer?

Certain people are more likely to develop ovarian cancer. They include those who:

What are the symptoms of ovarian cancer?

Ovarian cancer may not cause early signs or symptoms. By the time you do have signs or symptoms, the cancer is often advanced.

The signs and symptoms may include:

How is ovarian cancer diagnosed?

To find out if you have ovarian cancer, your health care provider:

Often the only way to know for sure that you have ovarian cancer is by having a biopsy of the tissue. A biopsy is done during surgery to remove the tumor.

What are the treatments for ovarian cancer?

Treatments for ovarian cancer may include:

Your provider may suggest that you have genetic testing to look for the gene changes that raise the risk for ovarian cancer. Knowing whether or not you have the gene change may help your provider decide on your treatment plan.

NIH: National Cancer Institute


[Learn More in MedlinePlus]

Code History