ICD-10 Diagnosis Code C50.622

Malignant neoplasm of axillary tail of left male breast

Diagnosis Code C50.622

ICD-10: C50.622
Short Description: Malignant neoplasm of axillary tail of left male breast
Long Description: Malignant neoplasm of axillary tail of left male breast
This is the 2019 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code C50.622

Valid for Submission
The code C50.622 is valid for submission for HIPAA-covered transactions.

Code Classification
  • Neoplasms (C00–D48)
    • Malignant neoplasms of breast (C50)
      • Malignant neoplasm of breast (C50)


Version 2019 Billable Code Diagnoses For Males Only

Information for Medical Professionals


Code Edits
The following edits are applicable to this code:
Diagnoses for males only - Diagnoses for males only.

Diagnostic Related Groups
The diagnosis code C50.622 is grouped in the following Diagnostic Related Group(s) (MS-DRG V35.0)

  • 582 - MASTECTOMY FOR MALIGNANCY WITH CC/MCC
  • 583 - MASTECTOMY FOR MALIGNANCY WITHOUT CC/MCC

Convert to ICD-9
  • 175.9 - Mal neo male breast NEC (Approximate Flag)

Information for Patients


Male Breast Cancer

Although breast cancer is much more common in women, men can get it too. It happens most often to men between the ages of 60 and 70.

Breast lumps usually aren't cancer. However, most men with breast cancer have lumps. Other breast symptoms can include

  • Dimpled or puckered skin
  • A red, scaly nipple or skin
  • Fluid discharge

Risk factors for male breast cancer include exposure to radiation, a family history of breast cancer, and having high estrogen levels, which can happen with diseases like cirrhosis or Klinefelter's syndrome.

Treatment for male breast cancer is usually a mastectomy, which is surgery to remove the breast. Other treatments include radiation, chemotherapy and/or hormone therapy.

NIH: National Cancer Institute

  • After chemotherapy - discharge (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Breast cancer in men (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Chest radiation - discharge (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Understanding Chemotherapy - NIH - Easy-to-Read (National Cancer Institute)
  • What to Know about External Beam Radiation Therapy - NIH - Easy-to-Read (National Cancer Institute)

[Read More]

Breast cancer Breast cancer is a disease in which certain cells in the breast become abnormal and multiply uncontrollably to form a tumor. Although breast cancer is much more common in women, this form of cancer can also develop in men. In both women and men, the most common form of breast cancer begins in cells lining the milk ducts (ductal cancer). In women, cancer can also develop in the glands that produce milk (lobular cancer). Most men have little or no lobular tissue, so lobular cancer in men is very rare.In its early stages, breast cancer usually does not cause pain and may exhibit no noticeable symptoms. As the cancer progresses, signs and symptoms can include a lump or thickening in or near the breast; a change in the size or shape of the breast; nipple discharge, tenderness, or retraction (turning inward); and skin irritation, dimpling, or scaliness. However, these changes can occur as part of many different conditions. Having one or more of these symptoms does not mean that a person definitely has breast cancer.In some cases, cancerous tumors can invade surrounding tissue and spread to other parts of the body. If breast cancer spreads, cancerous cells most often appear in the bones, liver, lungs, or brain. Tumors that begin at one site and then spread to other areas of the body are called metastatic cancers.A small percentage of all breast cancers cluster in families. These cancers are described as hereditary and are associated with inherited gene mutations. Hereditary breast cancers tend to develop earlier in life than noninherited (sporadic) cases, and new (primary) tumors are more likely to develop in both breasts.
[Read More]

ICD-10 Footnotes

General Equivalence Map Definitions
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

  • Approximate Flag - The approximate flag is on, indicating that the relationship between the code in the source system and the code in the target system is an approximate equivalent.
  • No Map Flag - The no map flag indicates that a code in the source system is not linked to any code in the target system.
  • Combination Flag - The combination flag indicates that more than one code in the target system is required to satisfy the full equivalent meaning of a code in the source system.

Present on Admission
The Present on Admission (POA) indicator is used for diagnosis codes included in claims involving inpatient admissions to general acute care hospitals. POA indicators must be reported to CMS on each claim to facilitate the grouping of diagnoses codes into the proper Diagnostic Related Groups (DRG). CMS publishes a listing of specific diagnosis codes that are exempt from the POA reporting requirement.

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