ICD-10-CM Code C49.12

Malignant neoplasm of connective and soft tissue of left upper limb, including shoulder

Version 2021 Billable Code

Valid for Submission

C49.12 is a billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of malignant neoplasm of connective and soft tissue of left upper limb, including shoulder. The code is valid for the fiscal year 2021 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions. The ICD-10-CM code C49.12 might also be used to specify conditions or terms like primary malignant neoplasm of soft tissue of left upper extremity.

ICD-10:C49.12
Short Description:Malig neoplm of conn and soft tiss of l upr limb, inc shldr
Long Description:Malignant neoplasm of connective and soft tissue of left upper limb, including shoulder

Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms or lay terms that might be used to identify the correct diagnosis code:

  • Primary malignant neoplasm of soft tissue of left upper extremity

Diagnostic Related Groups

The ICD-10 code C49.12 is grouped in the following groups for version MS-DRG V38.0 What are Diagnostic Related Groups?
The Diagnostic Related Groups (DRGs) are a patient classification scheme which provides a means of relating the type of patients a hospital treats. The DRGs divides all possible principal diagnoses into mutually exclusive principal diagnosis areas referred to as Major Diagnostic Categories (MDC).
applicable from 10/01/2020 through 09/30/2021.

  • 542 - PATHOLOGICAL FRACTURES AND MUSCULOSKELETAL AND CONNECTIVE TISSUE MALIGNANCY WITH MCC
  • 543 - PATHOLOGICAL FRACTURES AND MUSCULOSKELETAL AND CONNECTIVE TISSUE MALIGNANCY WITH CC
  • 544 - PATHOLOGICAL FRACTURES AND MUSCULOSKELETAL AND CONNECTIVE TISSUE MALIGNANCY WITHOUT CC/MCC

Convert C49.12 to ICD-9

  • 171.2 - Mal neo soft tissue arm (Approximate Flag)

Code Classification

  • Neoplasms (C00–D48)
    • Malignant neoplasms of mesothelial and soft tissue (C45-C49)
      • Malignant neoplasm of other connective and soft tissue (C49)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020
  • FY 2021 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2020 through 9/30/2021

Information for Patients


Cancer

Also called: Carcinoma, Malignancy, Neoplasms, Tumor

Cancer begins in your cells, which are the building blocks of your body. Normally, your body forms new cells as you need them, replacing old cells that die. Sometimes this process goes wrong. New cells grow even when you don't need them, and old cells don't die when they should. These extra cells can form a mass called a tumor. Tumors can be benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer while malignant ones are. Cells from malignant tumors can invade nearby tissues. They can also break away and spread to other parts of the body.

Cancer is not just one disease but many diseases. There are more than 100 different types of cancer. Most cancers are named for where they start. For example, lung cancer starts in the lung, and breast cancer starts in the breast. The spread of cancer from one part of the body to another is called metastasis. Symptoms and treatment depend on the cancer type and how advanced it is. Most treatment plans may include surgery, radiation and/or chemotherapy. Some may involve hormone therapy, immunotherapy or other types of biologic therapy, or stem cell transplantation.

NIH: National Cancer Institute

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  • Targeted therapies for cancer (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Understanding your cancer prognosis (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Your cancer care team (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Your cancer diagnosis: Do you need a second opinion? (Medical Encyclopedia)

[Learn More]

Connective Tissue Disorders

Your connective tissue supports many different parts of your body, such as your skin, eyes, and heart. It is like a "cellular glue" that gives your body parts their shape and helps keep them strong. It also helps some of your tissues do their work. It is made of many kinds of proteins. Cartilage and fat are types of connective tissue.

Over 200 disorders that impact connective tissue. There are different types:

  • Genetic disorders, such as Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, Marfan syndrome, and osteogenesis imperfecta
  • Autoimmune disorders, such as lupus and scleroderma
  • Cancers, like some types of soft tissue sarcoma

Each disorder has its own symptoms and needs different treatment.

NIH: National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases

  • Dupuytrens contracture (Medical Encyclopedia)

[Learn More]