ICD-10-CM Code C26.1

Malignant neoplasm of spleen

Version 2021 Billable Code Neoplasm Malignant Primary

Valid for Submission

C26.1 is a billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of malignant neoplasm of spleen. The code is valid for the fiscal year 2021 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions. The ICD-10-CM code C26.1 might also be used to specify conditions or terms like angiosarcoma or angiosarcoma of spleen or malignant tumor of spleen or primary malignant neoplasm of spleen.

The following anatomical sites found in the Table of Neoplasms apply to this code given the correct histological behavior: Neoplasm, neoplastic spleen, splenic NEC .

ICD-10:C26.1
Short Description:Malignant neoplasm of spleen
Long Description:Malignant neoplasm of spleen

Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries

The Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries is a list of ICD-10 codes, organized "head to toe" into chapters and sections with guidance for inclusions, exclusions, descriptions and more. The following references are applicable to the code C26.1:

Type 1 Excludes

Type 1 Excludes
A type 1 excludes note is a pure excludes note. It means "NOT CODED HERE!" An Excludes1 note indicates that the code excluded should never be used at the same time as the code above the Excludes1 note. An Excludes1 is used when two conditions cannot occur together, such as a congenital form versus an acquired form of the same condition.
  • Hodgkin lymphoma C81
  • non-Hodgkin lymphoma C82 C85

Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms or lay terms that might be used to identify the correct diagnosis code:

  • Angiosarcoma
  • Angiosarcoma of spleen
  • Malignant tumor of spleen
  • Primary malignant neoplasm of spleen

Diagnostic Related Groups

The ICD-10 code C26.1 is grouped in the following groups for version MS-DRG V38.0 What are Diagnostic Related Groups?
The Diagnostic Related Groups (DRGs) are a patient classification scheme which provides a means of relating the type of patients a hospital treats. The DRGs divides all possible principal diagnoses into mutually exclusive principal diagnosis areas referred to as Major Diagnostic Categories (MDC).
applicable from 10/01/2020 through 09/30/2021.

  • 820 - LYMPHOMA AND LEUKEMIA WITH MAJOR O.R. PROCEDURES WITH MCC
  • 821 - LYMPHOMA AND LEUKEMIA WITH MAJOR O.R. PROCEDURES WITH CC
  • 822 - LYMPHOMA AND LEUKEMIA WITH MAJOR O.R. PROCEDURES WITHOUT CC/MCC

Convert C26.1 to ICD-9

  • 159.1 - Malignant neo spleen NEC

Code Classification

  • Neoplasms (C00–D48)
    • Malignant neoplasms of digestive organs (C15-C26)
      • Malignant neoplasm of other and ill-defined digestive organs (C26)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020
  • FY 2021 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2020 through 9/30/2021

Table of Neoplasms

The code C26.1 is included in the table of neoplasms by anatomical site. For each site there are six possible code numbers according to whether the neoplasm in question is malignant, benign, in situ, of uncertain behavior, or of unspecified nature. The description of the neoplasm will often indicate which of the six columns is appropriate.

Where such descriptors are not present, the remainder of the Index should be consulted where guidance is given to the appropriate column for each morphological (histological) variety listed. However, the guidance in the Index can be overridden if one of the descriptors mentioned above is present.

Neoplasm, neoplastic Malignant
Primary
Malignant
Secondary
CaInSitu Benign Uncertain
Behavior
Unspecified
Behavior
»Neoplasm, neoplastic
  »spleen, splenic NEC
C26.1C78.89D01.7D13.9D37.8D49.0

Information for Patients


Cancer

Also called: Carcinoma, Malignancy, Neoplasms, Tumor

Cancer begins in your cells, which are the building blocks of your body. Normally, your body forms new cells as you need them, replacing old cells that die. Sometimes this process goes wrong. New cells grow even when you don't need them, and old cells don't die when they should. These extra cells can form a mass called a tumor. Tumors can be benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer while malignant ones are. Cells from malignant tumors can invade nearby tissues. They can also break away and spread to other parts of the body.

Cancer is not just one disease but many diseases. There are more than 100 different types of cancer. Most cancers are named for where they start. For example, lung cancer starts in the lung, and breast cancer starts in the breast. The spread of cancer from one part of the body to another is called metastasis. Symptoms and treatment depend on the cancer type and how advanced it is. Most treatment plans may include surgery, radiation and/or chemotherapy. Some may involve hormone therapy, immunotherapy or other types of biologic therapy, or stem cell transplantation.

NIH: National Cancer Institute

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Spleen Diseases

Also called: Splenic diseases

Your spleen is an organ above your stomach and under your ribs on your left side. It is about as big as your fist. The spleen is part of your lymphatic system, which fights infection and keeps your body fluids in balance. It contains white blood cells that fight germs. Your spleen also helps control the amount of blood in your body, and destroys old and damaged cells.

Certain diseases might cause your spleen to swell. You can also damage or rupture your spleen in an injury, especially if it is already swollen. If your spleen is too damaged, you might need surgery to remove it. You can live without a spleen. Other organs, such as your liver, will take over some of the spleen's work. Without a spleen, however, your body will lose some of its ability to fight infections.

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