2022 ICD-10-CM Code B97.7

Papillomavirus as the cause of diseases classified elsewhere

Version 2021

Valid for Submission

ICD-10:B97.7
Short Description:Papillomavirus as the cause of diseases classified elsewhere
Long Description:Papillomavirus as the cause of diseases classified elsewhere

Code Classification

  • Certain infectious and parasitic diseases (A00–B99)
    • Bacterial and viral infectious agents (B95-B97)
      • Viral agents as the cause of diseases classified elsewhere (B97)

B97.7 is a billable diagnosis code used to specify a medical diagnosis of papillomavirus as the cause of diseases classified elsewhere. The code B97.7 is valid during the fiscal year 2022 from October 01, 2021 through September 30, 2022 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions.

The ICD-10-CM code B97.7 might also be used to specify conditions or terms like anal intraepithelial neoplasia , anogenital human papillomavirus infection, anogenital papillomaviral intraepithelial neoplasia, bowenoid papulosis, bowenoid papulosis of anus , bowenoid papulosis of anus, etc.

The code B97.7 describes a circumstance which influences the patient's health status but not a current illness or injury. The code is unacceptable as a principal diagnosis.

Index to Diseases and Injuries

The Index to Diseases and Injuries is an alphabetical listing of medical terms, with each term mapped to one or more ICD-10 code(s). The following references for the code B97.7 are found in the index:

Code Edits

The Medicare Code Editor (MCE) detects and reports errors in the coding of claims data. The following ICD-10 Code Edits are applicable to this code:

Approximate Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms or lay terms that might be used to identify the correct diagnosis code:

Convert B97.7 to ICD-9 Code

Information for Patients


HPV

What is HPV?

Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a group of related viruses. They can cause warts on different parts of your body. There are more than 200 types. About 40 of them are spread through direct sexual contact with someone who has the virus. They can also spread through other intimate, skin-to-skin contact. Some of these types can cause cancer.

There are two categories of sexually transmitted HPV. Low-risk HPV can cause warts on or around your genitals, anus, mouth, or throat. High-risk HPV can cause various cancers:

Most HPV infections go away on their own and don't cause cancer. But sometimes the infections last longer. When a high-risk HPV infection lasts for many years, it can lead to cell changes. If these changes are not treated, they may get worse over time and become cancer.

Who is at risk for HPV infections?

HPV infections are very common. Nearly all sexually active people are infected with HPV soon after they become sexually active.

What are the symptoms of HPV infections?

Some people develop warts from certain low-risk HPV infections, but the other types (including the high-risk types) have no symptoms.

If a high-risk HPV infection lasts for many years and causes cell changes, you may have symptoms. You may also have symptoms if those cell changes develop into cancer. Which symptoms you have depends on which part of the body is affected.

How are HPV infections diagnosed?

Health care providers can usually diagnose warts by looking at them.

For women, there are cervical cancer screening tests which can find changes in the cervix that might lead to cancer. As part of the screening, women may have Pap tests, HPV tests , or both.

What are the treatments for HPV infections?

An HPV infection itself cannot be treated. There are medicines that you can apply to a wart. If they don't work, your health care provide could freeze, burn, or surgically remove it.

There are treatments for the cell changes caused by infection with high-risk HPV. They include medicines that you apply to the area that is affected and various surgical procedures.

People who have HPV-related cancers usually get the same types of treatment as people who have cancers that are not caused by HPV. An exception to this is for people who have certain oral and throat cancers. They may have different treatment options.

Can HPV infections be prevented?

Correct usage of latex condoms greatly reduces, but does not completely eliminate, the risk of catching or spreading HPV. If your or your partner is allergic to latex, you can use polyurethane condoms. The most reliable way to avoid infection is to not have anal, vaginal, or oral sex.

Vaccines can protect against several types of HPV, including some that can cause cancer. The vaccines provide the most protection when people get them before they are exposed to the virus. This means that it is best for people to get them before they become sexually active.

NIH: National Cancer Institute


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Code History

  • FY 2021 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2020 through 9/30/2021
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016 (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)