ICD-10 Code B97.7

Papillomavirus as the cause of diseases classified elsewhere

Version 2019 Billable Code Unacceptable Principal Diagnosis
ICD-10:B97.7
Short Description:Papillomavirus as the cause of diseases classified elsewhere
Long Description:Papillomavirus as the cause of diseases classified elsewhere

Valid for Submission

ICD-10 B97.7 is a billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of papillomavirus as the cause of diseases classified elsewhere. The code is valid for the year 2019 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions.

Code Classification

  • Certain infectious and parasitic diseases (A00–B99)
    • Bacterial and viral infectious agents (B95-B97)
      • Viral agents as the cause of diseases classified elsewhere (B97)

Information for Medical Professionals

Code Edits

The Medicare Code Editor (MCE) detects and reports errors in the coding of claims data. The following ICD-10 Code Edits are applicable to this code:

  • Unacceptable principal diagnosis - There are selected codes that describe a circumstance which influences an individual’s health status but not a current illness or injury, or codes that are not specific manifestations but may be due to an underlying cause. These codes are considered unacceptable as a principal diagnosis.

Diagnostic Related Groups

The Diagnostic Related Groups (DRGs) are a patient classification scheme which provides a means of relating the type of patients a hospital treats. The DRGs divides all possible principal diagnoses into mutually exclusive principal diagnosis areas referred to as Major Diagnostic Categories (MDC). The diagnosis code B97.7 is grouped in the following groups for version MS-DRG V36.0 applicable from 10/01/2018 through 09/30/2019.

  • 865 - VIRAL ILLNESS WITH MCC
  • 866 - VIRAL ILLNESS WITHOUT MCC

Convert B97.7 to ICD-9

The following crosswalk between ICD-10 to ICD-9 is based based on the General Equivalence Mappings (GEMS) information:

  • 079.4 - Human papillomavirus

Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms:

  • Anal intraepithelial neoplasia
  • Anogenital human papillomavirus infection
  • Anogenital papillomaviral intraepithelial neoplasia
  • Bowenoid papulosis
  • Bowenoid papulosis of anus
  • Bowenoid papulosis of anus
  • Bowenoid papulosis of penis
  • Bowenoid papulosis of penis
  • Bowenoid papulosis of vulva
  • Bowenoid papulosis of vulva
  • Carcinoma in situ of glans penis
  • Carcinoma in situ of penis
  • Carcinoma in situ of skin of penis
  • Carcinoma in situ of vulva
  • Disease due to Papillomaviridae
  • Epidermoid plantar cysts due to HPV 60
  • HPV - Human papillomavirus test positive
  • Human papilloma virus infection
  • Human papilloma virus infection of vocal cord
  • Human papilloma virus-associated intraepithelial neoplasia
  • Human papillomavirus deoxyribonucleic acid test positive, low risk on cervical specimen
  • Infective dermatosis of perianal skin
  • Intraepithelial squamous carcinoma of anogenital region
  • Intraepithelial squamous carcinoma of anogenital region
  • Intraepithelial squamous carcinoma of anogenital region
  • Penile intraepithelial neoplasia
  • Penile intraepithelial neoplasia grade III
  • Vulval intraepithelial neoplasia
  • Vulval intraepithelial neoplasia grade 3

Index to Diseases and Injuries

The Index to Diseases and Injuries is an alphabetical listing of medical terms, with each term mapped to one or more ICD-10 code(s). The following references for the code B97.7 are found in the index:


Information for Patients


HPV

Also called: Human papillomavirus

Human papillomaviruses (HPV) are a group of related viruses. They can cause warts on different parts of your body. There are more than 200 types. About 40 of those types affect the genitals. They are spread through sexual contact with an infected partner. Some of those can put you at risk for cancer.

There are two categories of sexually-transmitted HPV. Low-risk HPV can cause genital warts. High-risk HPV can cause various cancers:

  • Cervical cancer
  • Anal cancer
  • Some types of oral and throat cancer
  • Vulvar cancer
  • Vaginal cancer
  • Penile cancer

HPV infections are the most common sexually transmitted infections in the United States. Anyone who has ever been sexually active can get HPV, but you are more likely to get it if you have had many sex partners or have had sex with someone who has had many partners. Because it is so common, most people get HPV infections shortly after becoming sexually active for the first time.

Some people develop genital warts from HPV infection, but others have no symptoms. Most high-risk HPV infections go away within 1 to 2 years and do not cause cancer. Some HPV infections, however, can persist for many years. Those infections can lead to cell changes that, if not treated, may become cancerous.

In women, Pap tests can detect changes in the cervix that might lead to cancer. Pap tests, along with HPV tests, are used in cervical cancer screening.

Correct usage of latex condoms greatly reduces, but does not completely eliminate, the risk of catching or spreading HPV. The most reliable way to avoid infection is to not have anal, vaginal, or oral sex. Vaccines can protect against several types of HPV, including some that can cause cancer.

NIH: National Cancer Institute

  • Cervical cancer -- screening and prevention (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Condom Fact Sheet in Brief (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
  • HPV and Cancer (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
  • HPV DNA test (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • HPV vaccine (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • HPV Vaccine - Gardasil: What You Need to Know (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
  • Pap and HPV Testing - NIH (National Cancer Institute)

[Read More]

ICD-10 Footnotes

General Equivalence Map Definitions
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

  • Approximate Flag - The approximate flag is on, indicating that the relationship between the code in the source system and the code in the target system is an approximate equivalent.
  • No Map Flag - The no map flag indicates that a code in the source system is not linked to any code in the target system.
  • Combination Flag - The combination flag indicates that more than one code in the target system is required to satisfy the full equivalent meaning of a code in the source system.