ICD-10 Diagnosis Code B96.81

Helicobacter pylori as the cause of diseases classd elswhr

Diagnosis Code B96.81

ICD-10: B96.81
Short Description: Helicobacter pylori as the cause of diseases classd elswhr
Long Description: Helicobacter pylori [H. pylori] as the cause of diseases classified elsewhere
This is the 2019 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code B96.81

Valid for Submission
The code B96.81 is valid for submission for HIPAA-covered transactions.

Code Classification
  • Certain infectious and parasitic diseases (A00–B99)
    • Bacterial and viral infectious agents (B95-B97)
      • Oth bacterial agents as the cause of diseases classd elswhr (B96)

Information for Medical Professionals


Code Edits
The following edits are applicable to this code:
Unacceptable principal diagnosis - There are selected codes that describe a circumstance which influences an individual’s health status but not a current illness or injury, or codes that are not specific manifestations but may be due to an underlying cause. These codes are considered unacceptable as a principal diagnosis.

Diagnostic Related Groups
The diagnosis code B96.81 is grouped in the following Diagnostic Related Group(s) (MS-DRG V35.0)

  • 867 - OTHER INFECTIOUS AND PARASITIC DISEASES DIAGNOSES WITH MCC
  • 868 - OTHER INFECTIOUS AND PARASITIC DISEASES DIAGNOSES WITH CC
  • 869 - OTHER INFECTIOUS AND PARASITIC DISEASES DIAGNOSES WITHOUT CC/MCC

Convert to ICD-9
Synonyms
  • Anastomotic ulcer of stomach caused by Helicobacter pylori
  • Colitis caused by bacterium
  • Duodenal ulcer caused by bacterium
  • Duodenal ulcer caused by drug
  • Duodenal ulcer caused by Helicobacter pylori
  • Duodenal ulcer caused by Helicobacter pylori and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agent
  • Duodenal ulcer caused by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug
  • Duodenitis caused by Helicobacter pylori
  • Gastric hemorrhage due to Helicobacter pylori
  • Gastric ulcer caused by bacterium
  • Gastric ulcer caused by bacterium
  • Gastric ulcer caused by bacterium
  • Gastric ulcer caused by drug
  • Gastric ulcer caused by Helicobacter pylori and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agent
  • Gastric ulcer caused by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug in therapeutic use
  • Gastric ulcer due to Helicobacter pylori
  • Gastritis caused by bacterium
  • Helicobacter blood test observations
  • Helicobacter blood test positive
  • Helicobacter pylori gastrointestinal tract infection
  • Helicobacter pylori-associated gastritis
  • Helicobacter serology positive
  • Helicobacter-associated colitis
  • Helicobacter-associated disease
  • Helicobacter-associated gastritis
  • Helicobacter-associated proctitis
  • Helicobacter-associated pyloric ulcer
  • Infection caused by Helicobacter pylori
  • Infective duodenitis
  • Infective proctitis
  • Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced enteropathy
  • Pyloric ulcer

Information for Patients


Helicobacter Pylori Infections

Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a type of bacteria that causes infection in the stomach. It is the main cause of peptic ulcers, and it can also cause gastritis and stomach cancer.

About 30 to 40 percent of people in the United States get an H. pylori infection. Most people get it as a child. H. pylori usually does not cause symptoms. But it can break down the inner protective coating in some people's stomachs and cause inflammation. This can lead to gastritis or a peptic ulcer.

Researchers aren't sure how H. pylori spreads. They think that it may spread by unclean food and water, or through contact with an infected person's saliva and other body fluids.

A peptic ulcer causes a dull or burning pain in your stomach, especially when you have an empty stomach. It lasts for minutes to hours, and it may come and go for several days or weeks. It may also cause other symptoms, such as bloating, nausea, and weight loss. If you have the symptoms of a peptic ulcer, your health care provider will check to see whether you have H. pylori. There are blood, breath, and stool tests to check for H. pylori. In some cases, you may need an upper endoscopy, often with a biopsy.

If you do have a peptic ulcer, the treatment is with a combination of antibiotics and acid-reducing medicines. You will need to be tested again after treatment to make sure the infection is gone.

There is no vaccine for H. pylori. Since H. pylori might spread through unclean food and water, you might be able to prevent it if you

  • Wash your hands after using the bathroom and before eating
  • Eat properly prepared food
  • Drink water from a clean, safe source

NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases


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ICD-10 Footnotes

General Equivalence Map Definitions
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

  • Approximate Flag - The approximate flag is on, indicating that the relationship between the code in the source system and the code in the target system is an approximate equivalent.
  • No Map Flag - The no map flag indicates that a code in the source system is not linked to any code in the target system.
  • Combination Flag - The combination flag indicates that more than one code in the target system is required to satisfy the full equivalent meaning of a code in the source system.

Present on Admission
The Present on Admission (POA) indicator is used for diagnosis codes included in claims involving inpatient admissions to general acute care hospitals. POA indicators must be reported to CMS on each claim to facilitate the grouping of diagnoses codes into the proper Diagnostic Related Groups (DRG). CMS publishes a listing of specific diagnosis codes that are exempt from the POA reporting requirement.

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