ICD-10 Code A81.8

Other atypical virus infections of central nervous system

Version 2019 Non-Billable Code
ICD-10: A81.8
Short Description:Other atypical virus infections of central nervous system
Long Description:Other atypical virus infections of central nervous system

Not Valid for Submission

ICD-10 A81.8 is a "header" nonspecific and non-billable code code, consider using a code with a higher level of specificity for a diagnosis of other atypical virus infections of central nervous system. The code is NOT valid for the year 2019 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions.

Consider the following ICD-10 codes with a higher level of specificity:

  • A81.81 - Kuru
  • A81.82 - Gerstmann-Straussler-Scheinker syndrome
  • A81.83 - Fatal familial insomnia
  • A81.89 - Other atypical virus infections of central nervous system

Code Classification

  • Certain infectious and parasitic diseases (A00–B99)
    • Viral and prion infections of the central nervous system (A80-A89)
      • Atypical virus infections of central nervous system (A81)

Information for Patients


Neurologic Diseases

Also called: Nervous system diseases

The brain, spinal cord, and nerves make up the nervous system. Together they control all the workings of the body. When something goes wrong with a part of your nervous system, you can have trouble moving, speaking, swallowing, breathing, or learning. You can also have problems with your memory, senses, or mood.

There are more than 600 neurologic diseases. Major types include

  • Diseases caused by faulty genes, such as Huntington's disease and muscular dystrophy
  • Problems with the way the nervous system develops, such as spina bifida
  • Degenerative diseases, where nerve cells are damaged or die, such as Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease
  • Diseases of the blood vessels that supply the brain, such as stroke
  • Injuries to the spinal cord and brain
  • Seizure disorders, such as epilepsy
  • Cancer, such as brain tumors
  • infections, such as meningitis
  • Cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) collection (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • EEG (Medical Encyclopedia)

[Learn More]

Viral Infections

Viruses are very tiny germs. They are made of genetic material inside of a protein coating. Viruses cause familiar infectious diseases such as the common cold, flu and warts. They also cause severe illnesses such as HIV/AIDS, smallpox, and Ebola.

Viruses are like hijackers. They invade living, normal cells and use those cells to multiply and produce other viruses like themselves. This can kill, damage, or change the cells and make you sick. Different viruses attack certain cells in your body such as your liver, respiratory system, or blood.

When you get a virus, you may not always get sick from it. Your immune system may be able to fight it off.

For most viral infections, treatments can only help with symptoms while you wait for your immune system to fight off the virus. Antibiotics do not work for viral infections. There are antiviral medicines to treat some viral infections. Vaccines can help prevent you from getting many viral diseases.

  • ECHO virus (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Enterovirus D68 (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Hand-foot-mouth disease (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Herpangina (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Molluscum contagiosum (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Parainfluenza (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Roseola (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Zika virus disease (Medical Encyclopedia)

[Learn More]

ICD-10 Footnotes

General Equivalence Map Definitions
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

  • Approximate Flag - The approximate flag is on, indicating that the relationship between the code in the source system and the code in the target system is an approximate equivalent.
  • No Map Flag - The no map flag indicates that a code in the source system is not linked to any code in the target system.
  • Combination Flag - The combination flag indicates that more than one code in the target system is required to satisfy the full equivalent meaning of a code in the source system.