ICD-10-CM Code A71.9

Trachoma, unspecified

Version 2020 Billable Code

Valid for Submission

A71.9 is a billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of trachoma, unspecified. The code is valid for the year 2020 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions. The ICD-10-CM code A71.9 might also be used to specify conditions or terms like chlamydial conjunctivitis or trachoma.

ICD-10:A71.9
Short Description:Trachoma, unspecified
Long Description:Trachoma, unspecified

Index to Diseases and Injuries

The Index to Diseases and Injuries is an alphabetical listing of medical terms, with each term mapped to one or more ICD-10 code(s). The following references for the code A71.9 are found in the index:


Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms or lay terms that might be used to identify the correct diagnosis code:

  • Chlamydial conjunctivitis
  • Trachoma

Clinical Information

  • TRACHOMA-. a chronic infection of the conjunctiva and cornea caused by chlamydia trachomatis.

Diagnostic Related Groups

The ICD-10 code A71.9 is grouped in the following groups for version MS-DRG V37.0 What are Diagnostic Related Groups?
The Diagnostic Related Groups (DRGs) are a patient classification scheme which provides a means of relating the type of patients a hospital treats. The DRGs divides all possible principal diagnoses into mutually exclusive principal diagnosis areas referred to as Major Diagnostic Categories (MDC).
applicable from 10/01/2020 through 09/30/2020.

  • 124 - OTHER DISORDERS OF THE EYE WITH MCC
  • 125 - OTHER DISORDERS OF THE EYE WITHOUT MCC

Convert A71.9 to ICD-9

Code Classification

  • Certain infectious and parasitic diseases (A00–B99)
    • Other diseases caused by chlamydiae (A70-A74)
      • Trachoma (A71)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020

Information for Patients


Bacterial Infections

Bacteria are living things that have only one cell. Under a microscope, they look like balls, rods, or spirals. They are so small that a line of 1,000 could fit across a pencil eraser. Most bacteria won't hurt you - less than 1 percent of the different types make people sick. Many are helpful. Some bacteria help to digest food, destroy disease-causing cells, and give the body needed vitamins. Bacteria are also used in making healthy foods like yogurt and cheese.

But infectious bacteria can make you ill. They reproduce quickly in your body. Many give off chemicals called toxins, which can damage tissue and make you sick. Examples of bacteria that cause infections include Streptococcus, Staphylococcus, and E. coli.

Antibiotics are the usual treatment. When you take antibiotics, follow the directions carefully. Each time you take antibiotics, you increase the chances that bacteria in your body will learn to resist them causing antibiotic resistance. Later, you could get or spread an infection that those antibiotics cannot cure.


[Learn More]

Eye Infections

Your eyes can get infections from bacteria, fungi, or viruses. Eye infections can occur in different parts of the eye and can affect just one eye or both. Two common eye infections are

  • Conjunctivitis - also known as pinkeye. Conjunctivitis is often due to an infection. Children frequently get it, and it is very contagious.
  • Stye - a bump on the eyelid that happens when bacteria from your skin get into the hair follicle of an eyelash.

Symptoms of eye infections may include redness, itching, swelling, discharge, pain, or problems with vision. Treatment depends on the cause of the infection and may include compresses, eye drops, creams, or antibiotics.


[Learn More]

Eyelid Disorders

Your eyelids help protect your eyes. When you blink, your eyelids spread moisture over your eyes. Blinking also helps move dirt or other particles off the surface of the eye. You close your eyelids when you see something coming toward your eyes. This can help protect against injuries.

Like most other parts of your body, your eyelids can get infected, inflamed, or even develop cancer. There are also specific eyelid problems, including

  • Eyelids that turn in or out
  • Eyelids that droop
  • Abnormal blinking or twitching

Treatment of eyelid problems depends on the cause.


[Learn More]