ICD-10-CM Code A59.03

Trichomonal cystitis and urethritis

Version 2020 Billable Code

Valid for Submission

A59.03 is a billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of trichomonal cystitis and urethritis. The code is valid for the year 2020 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions. The ICD-10-CM code A59.03 might also be used to specify conditions or terms like trichomonal cystitis or trichomonal urethritis or urogenital infection by trichomonas vaginalis.

ICD-10:A59.03
Short Description:Trichomonal cystitis and urethritis
Long Description:Trichomonal cystitis and urethritis

Index to Diseases and Injuries

The Index to Diseases and Injuries is an alphabetical listing of medical terms, with each term mapped to one or more ICD-10 code(s). The following references for the code A59.03 are found in the index:


Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms or lay terms that might be used to identify the correct diagnosis code:

  • Trichomonal cystitis
  • Trichomonal urethritis
  • Urogenital infection by Trichomonas vaginalis

Diagnostic Related Groups

The ICD-10 code A59.03 is grouped in the following groups for version MS-DRG V37.0 What are Diagnostic Related Groups?
The Diagnostic Related Groups (DRGs) are a patient classification scheme which provides a means of relating the type of patients a hospital treats. The DRGs divides all possible principal diagnoses into mutually exclusive principal diagnosis areas referred to as Major Diagnostic Categories (MDC).
applicable from 10/01/2020 through 09/30/2020.

  • 727 - INFLAMMATION OF THE MALE REPRODUCTIVE SYSTEM WITH MCC
  • 728 - INFLAMMATION OF THE MALE REPRODUCTIVE SYSTEM WITHOUT MCC

Convert A59.03 to ICD-9

  • 131.02 - Trichomonal urethritis (Approximate Flag)

Code Classification

  • Certain infectious and parasitic diseases (A00–B99)
    • Infections with a predominantly sexual mode of transmission (A50-A64)
      • Trichomoniasis (A59)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020

Information for Patients


Trichomoniasis

Trichomoniasis is a sexually transmitted disease caused by a parasite. It spreads from person to person during sex. Many people do not have any symptoms. If you do get symptoms, they usually happen within 5 to 28 days after being infected.

It can cause vaginitis in women. Symptoms include

  • Yellow-green or gray discharge from the vagina
  • Discomfort during sex
  • Vaginal odor
  • Painful urination
  • Itching burning, and soreness of the vagina and vulva

Most men do not have symptoms. If they do, they may have

  • Itching or irritation inside the penis
  • Burning after urination or ejaculation
  • Discharge from the penis

Trichomoniasis can increase the risk of getting or spreading other sexually transmitted diseases. Pregnant women with trichomoniasis are more likely to give birth too early, and their babies are more likely have a low birth weight.

Lab tests can tell if you have the infection. Treatment is with antibiotics. If you are infected, you and your partner must be treated.

Correct usage of latex condoms greatly reduces, but does not eliminate, the risk of catching or spreading trichomoniasis. The most reliable way to avoid infection is to not have anal, vaginal, or oral sex.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention


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Urinary Tract Infections

The urinary system is the body's drainage system for removing wastes and extra water. It includes two kidneys, two ureters, a bladder, and a urethra. Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are the second most common type of infection in the body.

You may have a UTI if you notice

  • Pain or burning when you urinate
  • Fever, tiredness, or shakiness
  • An urge to urinate often
  • Pressure in your lower belly
  • Urine that smells bad or looks cloudy or reddish
  • Pain in your back or side below the ribs

People of any age or sex can get UTIs. But about four times as many women get UTIs as men. You're also at higher risk if you have diabetes, need a tube to drain your bladder, or have a spinal cord injury.

If you think you have a UTI it is important to see your doctor. Your doctor can tell if you have a UTI with a urine test. Treatment is with antibiotics.

NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases


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