A37.9 - Whooping cough, unspecified species

Version 2023
ICD-10:A37.9
Short Description:Whooping cough, unspecified species
Long Description:Whooping cough, unspecified species
Status: Not Valid for Submission
Version:ICD-10-CM 2023
Code Classification:
  • Certain infectious and parasitic diseases (A00–B99)
    • Other bacterial diseases (A30-A49)
      • Whooping cough (A37)

A37.9 is a non-specific and non-billable ICD-10 code code, consider using a code with a higher level of specificity for a diagnosis of whooping cough, unspecified species. The code is not specific and is NOT valid for the year 2023 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions. Category or Header define the heading of a category of codes that may be further subdivided by the use of 4th, 5th, 6th or 7th characters.

Unspecified diagnosis codes like A37.9 are acceptable when clinical information is unknown or not available about a particular condition. Although a more specific code is preferable, unspecified codes should be used when such codes most accurately reflect what is known about a patient's condition. Specific diagnosis codes should not be used if not supported by the patient's medical record.

Clinical Information

Specific Coding for Whooping cough, unspecified species

Non-specific codes like A37.9 require more digits to indicate the appropriate level of specificity. Consider using any of the following ICD-10 codes with a higher level of specificity when coding for whooping cough, unspecified species:

  • BILLABLE CODE - Use A37.90 for Whooping cough, unspecified species without pneumonia
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use A37.91 for Whooping cough, unspecified species with pneumonia

Patient Education


Whooping Cough

What is whooping cough?

Whooping cough, or pertussis, is a respiratory infection that can cause coughing fits. In serious cases, the coughing can become violent and rapid. You may cough so hard that you vomit. The name of the disease comes from the whooping noise you might make when you try to breathe in after coughing.

Whooping cough is very contagious and can affect anyone. But it can be especially serious in babies who did not yet get the vaccine. About half of babies under age one who get whooping cough need care in the hospital.

What causes whooping cough?

Whooping cough is caused by a type of bacteria called Bordetella pertussis. It spreads from person to person. People who have pertussis usually spread it through coughing, sneezing, or breathing very close to someone. It can also sometimes be spread by touching an infected surface and then touching your nose or mouth.

If you get pertussis, you are contagious for about 2 weeks after you start coughing. Antibiotics may shorten the time that you are contagious.

What are the symptoms of whooping cough?

The symptoms of pertussis usually start within 5 to 10 days after you are exposed. But sometimes you may not get symptoms until up to 3 weeks later.

Whooping cough usually starts with cold-like symptoms. They may last for 1 to 2 weeks and can include:

The early symptoms in babies can be different. They may only cough a little bit, or they may not cough at all. Babies may have apnea, which means that there is a pause in breathing. They may start to turn blue. If this happens, get medical care for your baby right away.

As whopping cough gets worse, the symptoms may include:

The coughing fits get worse and start happening more often, especially at night. You may have them for up to 10 weeks or more.

Recovery from this can happen slowly. Your cough gets milder and happens less often. The coughing fits can come back if you have another respiratory infection, even months after you first got whooping cough.

How is whooping cough diagnosed?

Your health care provider may use many tools to diagnose whooping cough:

What are the treatments for whooping cough?

The treatment for whooping cough is usually antibiotics. Early treatment is very important. It may make your infection less serious and can also help prevent spreading the disease to others.

Treatment after you have been sick for 3 weeks or longer may not help. The bacteria are gone from your body by then, even though you usually still have symptoms. This is because the bacteria have already done damage to your body.

Whooping cough can sometimes be very serious and require treatment in the hospital.

Can whooping cough be prevented?

Vaccines are the best way to prevent whooping cough. There are two vaccines in the United States that can help prevent whooping cough: DTaP and Tdap. These vaccines also provide protection against tetanus and diphtheria.

Babies and other people at high risk serious disease should be kept away from people who have whooping cough.

Sometimes health care providers give antibiotics to family members of people who have had whooping cough or people who have been exposed to it. The antibiotics may prevent them from getting the disease.

You may also help prevent the spread of whooping cough (and other respiratory diseases) by:

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention


[Learn More in MedlinePlus]

Code History