ICD-10-CM Code A32.82

Listerial endocarditis

Version 2020 Billable Code

Valid for Submission

A32.82 is a billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of listerial endocarditis. The code is valid for the year 2020 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions. The ICD-10-CM code A32.82 might also be used to specify conditions or terms like listerial endocarditis.

ICD-10:A32.82
Short Description:Listerial endocarditis
Long Description:Listerial endocarditis

Index to Diseases and Injuries

The Index to Diseases and Injuries is an alphabetical listing of medical terms, with each term mapped to one or more ICD-10 code(s). The following references for the code A32.82 are found in the index:


Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms or lay terms that might be used to identify the correct diagnosis code:

  • Listerial endocarditis

Diagnostic Related Groups

The ICD-10 code A32.82 is grouped in the following groups for version MS-DRG V37.0 What are Diagnostic Related Groups?
The Diagnostic Related Groups (DRGs) are a patient classification scheme which provides a means of relating the type of patients a hospital treats. The DRGs divides all possible principal diagnoses into mutually exclusive principal diagnosis areas referred to as Major Diagnostic Categories (MDC).
applicable from 10/01/2020 through 09/30/2020.

  • 867 - OTHER INFECTIOUS AND PARASITIC DISEASES DIAGNOSES WITH MCC
  • 868 - OTHER INFECTIOUS AND PARASITIC DISEASES DIAGNOSES WITH CC
  • 869 - OTHER INFECTIOUS AND PARASITIC DISEASES DIAGNOSES WITHOUT CC/MCC

Convert A32.82 to ICD-9

  • 027.0 - Listeriosis (Approximate Flag)

Code Classification

  • Certain infectious and parasitic diseases (A00–B99)
    • Other bacterial diseases (A30-A49)
      • Listeriosis (A32)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020

Information for Patients


Endocarditis

Endocarditis, also called infective endocarditis (IE), is an inflammation of the inner lining of the heart. The most common type, bacterial endocarditis, occurs when germs enter your heart. These germs come through your bloodstream from another part of your body, often your mouth. Bacterial endocarditis can damage your heart valves. If untreated, it can be life-threatening. It is rare in healthy hearts.

Risk factors include having

  • An abnormal or damaged heart valve
  • An artificial heart valve
  • Congenital heart defects

The signs and symptoms of IE can vary from person to person. They also can vary over time in the same person. Symptoms you might notice include fever, shortness of breath, fluid buildup in your arms or legs, tiny red spots on your skin, and weight loss. Your doctor will diagnose IE based on your risk factors, medical history, signs and symptoms, and lab and heart tests.

Early treatment can help you avoid complications. Treatment usually involves high-dose antibiotics. If your heart valve is damaged, you may need surgery.

If you're at risk for IE, brush and floss your teeth regularly, and have regular dental checkups. Germs from a gum infection can enter your bloodstream. If you are at high risk, your doctor might prescribe antibiotics before dental work and certain types of surgery.

NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute


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Listeria Infections

Listeriosis is a foodborne illness caused by Listeria monocytogenes, bacteria found in soil and water. It can be in a variety of raw foods as well as in processed foods and foods made from unpasteurized milk. Listeria is unlike many other germs because it can grow even in the cold temperature of the refrigerator.

Symptoms include fever and chills, headache, upset stomach and vomiting. Treatment is with antibiotics.

Anyone can get the illness. But it is most likely to affect pregnant women and unborn babies, older adults, and people with weak immune systems. To reduce your risk

  • Use precooked and ready-to-eat foods as soon as you can
  • Avoid raw milk and raw milk products
  • Heat ready-to-eat foods and leftovers until they are steaming hot
  • Wash fresh fruits and vegetables
  • Avoid rare meat and refrigerated smoked seafood

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention


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