2022 ICD-10-CM Code A04.72

Enterocolitis due to Clostridium difficile, not specified as recurrent

Version 2021

Valid for Submission

ICD-10:A04.72
Short Description:Enterocolitis d/t Clostridium difficile, not spcf as recur
Long Description:Enterocolitis due to Clostridium difficile, not specified as recurrent

Code Classification

  • Certain infectious and parasitic diseases (A00–B99)
    • Intestinal infectious diseases (A00-A09)
      • Other bacterial intestinal infections (A04)

A04.72 is a billable diagnosis code used to specify a medical diagnosis of enterocolitis due to clostridium difficile, not specified as recurrent. The code A04.72 is valid during the fiscal year 2022 from October 01, 2021 through September 30, 2022 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions.

The ICD-10-CM code A04.72 might also be used to specify conditions or terms like clostridial enteric disease, clostridial gastroenteritis, clostridioides difficile infection, clostridium difficile colitis, clostridium difficile diarrhea , clostridium difficile toxin a detected, etc.

Index to Diseases and Injuries

The Index to Diseases and Injuries is an alphabetical listing of medical terms, with each term mapped to one or more ICD-10 code(s). The following references for the code A04.72 are found in the index:

Approximate Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms or lay terms that might be used to identify the correct diagnosis code:

Replacement Code

A0472 replaces the following previously assigned ICD-10 code(s):

Convert A04.72 to ICD-9 Code

The General Equivalency Mapping (GEM) crosswalk indicates an approximate mapping between the ICD-10 code A04.72 its ICD-9 equivalent. The approximate mapping means there is not an exact match between the ICD-10 code and the ICD-9 code and the mapped code is not a precise representation of the original code.

Information for Patients


C. diff Infections

What is C. diff?

C. diff is a bacterium that can cause diarrhea and more serious intestinal conditions such as colitis. You may see it called other names - Clostridioides difficile (the new name), Clostridium difficile (an older name), and C. difficile. It causes close to half a million illnesses each year.

What causes C. diff infections?

C. diff bacteria are commonly found in the environment, but people usually only get C. diff infections when they are taking antibiotics. That's because antibiotics not only wipe out bad germs, they also kill the good germs that protect your body against infections. The effect of antibiotics can last as long as several months. If you come in contact with C. diff germs during this time, you can get sick. You are more likely to get a C. diff infection if you take antibiotics for more than a week.

C. diff spreads when people touch food, surfaces, or objects that are contaminated with feces (poop) from a person who has C. diff.

Who is at risk for C. diff infections?

You are at more likely to get a C. diff infection if you

What are the symptoms of C. diff infections?

The symptoms of C. diff infections include

Severe diarrhea causes you to lose a lot of fluids. This can put you at risk for dehydration.

How are C. diff infections diagnosed?

If you have been taking antibiotics recently and have symptoms of a C. diff infection, you should see your health care provider. Your provider will ask about your symptoms and do a lab test of your stool. In some cases, you might also need an imaging test to check for complications.

What are the treatments for C. diff infections?

Certain antibiotics can treat C. diff infections. If you were already taking a different antibiotic when you got C. diff, you provider may ask you to stop taking that one.

If you have a severe case, you may need to stay in the hospital. If you have very severe pain or serious complications, you may need surgery to remove the diseased part of your colon.

About 1 in 5 people who have had a C. diff infection will get it again. It could be that your original infection came back or that you have new infection. Contact your health care provider if your symptoms come back.

Can C. diff infections be prevented?

There are steps you can take to try to prevent getting or spreading C. diff:

Health care providers can also help prevent C. diff infections by taking infection control precautions and improving how they prescribe antibiotics.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention


[Learn More in MedlinePlus]

Code History

  • FY 2021 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2020 through 9/30/2021
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018