A00.0 - Cholera due to Vibrio cholerae 01, biovar cholerae

Version 2023
ICD-10:A00.0
Short Description:Cholera due to Vibrio cholerae 01, biovar cholerae
Long Description:Cholera due to Vibrio cholerae 01, biovar cholerae
Status: Valid for Submission
Version:ICD-10-CM 2023
Code Classification:
  • Certain infectious and parasitic diseases (A00–B99)
    • Intestinal infectious diseases (A00-A09)
      • Cholera (A00)

A00.0 is a billable ICD-10 code used to specify a medical diagnosis of cholera due to vibrio cholerae 01, biovar cholerae. The code is valid during the fiscal year 2023 from October 01, 2022 through September 30, 2023 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions.

Approximate Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms or lay terms that might be used to identify the correct diagnosis code:

Clinical Information

Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries

The Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries is a list of ICD-10 codes, organized "head to toe" into chapters and sections with coding notes and guidance for inclusions, exclusions, descriptions and more. The following references are applicable to this diagnosis code:


Inclusion Terms

Inclusion Terms
These terms are the conditions for which that code is to be used. The terms may be synonyms of the code title, or, in the case of "other specified" codes, the terms are a list of the various conditions assigned to that code. The inclusion terms are not necessarily exhaustive. Additional terms found only in the Alphabetic Index may also be assigned to a code.

Index to Diseases and Injuries References

The Index to Diseases and Injuries is an alphabetical listing of medical terms, with each term mapped to one or more ICD-10 code(s). The following references for this diagnosis code are found in the injuries and diseases index:

Convert to ICD-9 Code

Source ICD-10 CodeTarget ICD-9 Code
A00.0001.0 - Cholera d/t vib cholerae

Patient Education


Cholera

Cholera is a bacterial infection that causes diarrhea. The cholera bacterium is usually found in water or food that has been contaminated by feces (poop). Cholera is rare in the US. You may get it if you travel to parts of the world with poor water and sewage treatment. Outbreaks can also happen after disasters. The disease is not likely to spread directly from person to person.

Cholera infections are often mild. Some people don't have any symptoms. If you do get symptoms, they usually start 2 to 3 days after infection. The most common symptom is watery diarrhea.

In some cases, the infection can be severe, causing lots of watery diarrhea, vomiting, and leg cramps. Because you quickly lose body fluids, you are at risk for dehydration and shock. Without treatment, you could die within hours. If you think that you might have cholera, you should get medical care right away.

Doctors diagnose cholera with a stool sample or rectal swab. Treatment is the replacement of the fluid and salts that you lost through the diarrhea. This is usually with a rehydration solution that you drink. People with severe cases may need an I.V. to replace the fluids. Some of them may also need antibiotics. Most people who get fluid replacement right away will recover.

There are vaccines to prevent cholera. One of them is available for adults in the U.S. Very few Americans need it, because most people do not visit areas that have an active cholera outbreak.

There are also simple steps you can take to help to prevent cholera infection:

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention


[Learn More in MedlinePlus]

Code History