ICD-9 Diagnosis Code V82.1

Screen-rheumatoid arthr

Diagnosis Code V82.1

ICD-9: V82.1
Short Description: Screen-rheumatoid arthr
Long Description: Screening for rheumatoid arthritis
This is the 2014 version of the ICD-9-CM diagnosis code V82.1

Code Classification
  • Supplementary classification of factors influencing health status and contact with health services
    • Persons without reported diagnosis encountered during examination and investigation of individuals and populations (V70-V82)
      • V82 Special screening for other conditions

Information for Patients

Health Screening

Also called: Screening tests

Screenings are tests that look for diseases before you have symptoms. Screening tests can find diseases early, when they're easier to treat. You can get some screenings in your doctor's office. Others need special equipment, so you may need to go to a different office or clinic.

Some conditions that doctors commonly screen for include

  • Breast cancer and cervical cancer in women
  • Colorectal cancer
  • Diabetes
  • High blood pressure
  • High cholesterol
  • Osteoporosis
  • Overweight and obesity
  • Prostate cancer in men

Which tests you need depends on your age, your sex, your family history, and whether you have risk factors for certain diseases. After a screening test, ask when you will get the results and whom to talk to about them.

Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality

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Rheumatoid Arthritis

Also called: RA

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a form of arthritis that causes pain, swelling, stiffness and loss of function in your joints. It can affect any joint but is common in the wrist and fingers.

More women than men get rheumatoid arthritis. It often starts in middle age and is most common in older people. You might have the disease for only a short time, or symptoms might come and go. The severe form can last a lifetime.

Rheumatoid arthritis is different from osteoarthritis, the common arthritis that often comes with older age. RA can affect body parts besides joints, such as your eyes, mouth and lungs. RA is an autoimmune disease, which means the arthritis results from your immune system attacking your body's own tissues.

No one knows what causes rheumatoid arthritis. Genes, environment, and hormones might contribute. Treatments include medicine, lifestyle changes, and surgery. These can slow or stop joint damage and reduce pain and swelling.

NIH: National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases

  • Collagen vascular disease
  • Felty syndrome
  • Rheumatoid arthritis
  • Rheumatoid factor (RF)
  • Rheumatoid lung disease

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