ICD-9 Diagnosis Code V76.44

Scrn malig neop-prostate

Diagnosis Code V76.44

ICD-9: V76.44
Short Description: Scrn malig neop-prostate
Long Description: Screening for malignant neoplasms of prostate
This is the 2014 version of the ICD-9-CM diagnosis code V76.44

Code Classification
  • Supplementary classification of factors influencing health status and contact with health services
    • Persons without reported diagnosis encountered during examination and investigation of individuals and populations (V70-V82)
      • V76 Special screening for malignant neoplasms

Information for Medical Professionals

Code Edits
The following edits are applicable to this code:
Diagnoses for males only Additional informationCallout TooltipDiagnoses for males only
Diagnoses for males only.

Convert to ICD-10 Additional informationCallout TooltipGeneral Equivalence Map
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.
  • Z12.5 - Encounter for screening for malignant neoplasm of prostate

Index of Diseases and Injuries
References found for the code V76.44 in the Index of Diseases and Injuries:

    • Screening (for) V82.9
      • malignant neoplasm (of) V76.9
        • prostate V76.44

Information for Patients

Prostate Cancer Screening

The prostate is the gland below a man's bladder that produces fluid for semen. Cancer screening is looking for cancer before you have any symptoms. Cancer found early may be easier to treat.

There is no standard screening test for prostate cancer. Researchers are studying different tests to find those with the fewest risks and most benefits. One test is the digital rectal exam (DRE). The doctor or nurse inserts a lubricated, gloved finger into your rectum to feel the prostate for lumps or anything unusual. Another test is the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) blood test. Your PSA level may be high if you have prostate cancer. It can also be high if you have an enlarged prostate (BPH) or other prostate problems. If your screening results are abnormal, your doctor may do more tests, such as an ultrasound, MRI, or a biopsy.

Prostate cancer screening has risks:

  • Finding prostate cancer may not improve your health or help you live longer
  • The results can sometimes be wrong
  • Follow-up tests, such as a biopsy, may have complications

You and your doctor should discuss your risk for prostate cancer, the pros and cons of the screening tests, and whether you should get them.

  • Digital rectal exam
  • Prostate cancer screenings
  • PSA

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