ICD-9 Diagnosis Code V76.19

Scrn mal neo breast NEC

Diagnosis Code V76.19

ICD-9: V76.19
Short Description: Scrn mal neo breast NEC
Long Description: Other screening breast examination
This is the 2014 version of the ICD-9-CM diagnosis code V76.19

Code Classification
  • Supplementary classification of factors influencing health status and contact with health services
    • Persons without reported diagnosis encountered during examination and investigation of individuals and populations (V70-V82)
      • V76 Special screening for malignant neoplasms

Information for Patients

Breast Cancer

Breast cancer affects one in eight women during their lives. Breast cancer kills more women in the United States than any cancer except lung cancer. No one knows why some women get breast cancer, but there are a number of risk factors. Risks that you cannot change include

  • Age - the chance of getting breast cancer rises as a woman gets older
  • Genes - there are two genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2, that greatly increase the risk. Women who have family members with breast or ovarian cancer may wish to be tested.
  • Personal factors - beginning periods before age 12 or going through menopause after age 55

Other risks include being overweight, using hormone replacement therapy (also called menopausal hormone therapy), taking birth control pills, drinking alcohol, not having children or having your first child after age 35 or having dense breasts.

Symptoms of breast cancer may include a lump in the breast, a change in size or shape of the breast or discharge from a nipple. Breast self-exam and mammography can help find breast cancer early when it is most treatable. Treatment may consist of radiation, lumpectomy, mastectomy, chemotherapy and hormone therapy.

Men can have breast cancer, too, but the number of cases is small.

NIH: National Cancer Institute

  • After chemotherapy - discharge
  • BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene testing
  • Breast biopsy -- stereotactic
  • Breast biopsy -- ultrasound
  • Breast cancer
  • Breast cancer screenings
  • Breast lump
  • Breast MRI scan
  • Breast PET scan
  • Breast radiation - discharge
  • Breast self exam
  • Breast ultrasound
  • Chest radiation - discharge
  • Lymphedema
  • Mammography
  • Understanding Chemotherapy - NIH - Easy-to-Read (National Cancer Institute)
  • Understanding your breast cancer risk
  • What to Know about Brachytherapy (A Type of Internal Radiation Therapy) - NIH - Easy-to-Read (National Cancer Institute)
  • What to Know about External Beam Radiation Therapy - NIH - Easy-to-Read (National Cancer Institute)

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Health Screening

Also called: Screening tests

Screenings are tests that look for diseases before you have symptoms. Screening tests can find diseases early, when they're easier to treat. You can get some screenings in your doctor's office. Others need special equipment, so you may need to go to a different office or clinic.

Some conditions that doctors commonly screen for include

  • Breast cancer and cervical cancer in women
  • Colorectal cancer
  • Diabetes
  • High blood pressure
  • High cholesterol
  • Osteoporosis
  • Overweight and obesity
  • Prostate cancer in men

Which tests you need depends on your age, your sex, your family history, and whether you have risk factors for certain diseases. After a screening test, ask when you will get the results and whom to talk to about them.

Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality

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A mammogram is an x-ray picture of the breast. It can be used to check for breast cancer in women who have no signs or symptoms of the disease. It can also be used if you have a lump or other sign of breast cancer.

Screening mammography is the type of mammogram that checks you when you have no symptoms. It can help reduce the number of deaths from breast cancer among women ages 40 to 70. But it can also have drawbacks. Mammograms can sometimes find something that looks abnormal but isn't cancer. This leads to further testing and can cause you anxiety. Sometimes mammograms can miss cancer when it is there. It also exposes you to radiation. You should talk to your doctor about the benefits and drawbacks of mammograms. Together, you can decide when to start and how often to have a mammogram.

Mammograms are also recommended for younger women who have symptoms of breast cancer or who have a high risk of the disease.

When you have a mammogram, you stand in front of an x-ray machine. The person who takes the x-rays places your breast between two plastic plates. The plates press your breast and make it flat. This may be uncomfortable, but it helps get a clear picture. You should get a written report of your mammogram results within 30 days.

NIH: National Cancer Institute

  • Breast cancer screenings
  • Mammogram - calcifications
  • Mammography

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