ICD-9 Diagnosis Code V24.0

Postpart care after del

Diagnosis Code V24.0

ICD-9: V24.0
Short Description: Postpart care after del
Long Description: Postpartum care and examination immediately after delivery
This is the 2014 version of the ICD-9-CM diagnosis code V24.0

Code Classification
  • Supplementary classification of factors influencing health status and contact with health services
    • Persons encountering health services in circumstances related to reproduction and development (V20-V29)
      • V24 Postpartum care and examination

Information for Medical Professionals

Code Edits
The following edits are applicable to this code:
Maternity diagnoses (age 12 through 55) Additional informationCallout TooltipMaternity diagnoses (age 12 through 55)
Maternity diagnoses: Age range is 12–55 years inclusive.

Convert to ICD-10 Additional informationCallout TooltipGeneral Equivalence Map
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.
  • Z39.0 - Encntr for care and exam of mother immediately after del

Index of Diseases and Injuries
References found for the code V24.0 in the Index of Diseases and Injuries:

Information for Patients


When you are ready to have your baby, you'll go through labor. Contractions let you know labor is starting. When contractions are five minutes apart, your body is ready to push the baby out.

During the first stage of labor, your cervix slowly opens, or dilates, to about 4 inches wide. At the same time, it becomes thinner. This is called effacement. You shouldn't push until your uterus is fully effaced and dilated. When it is, the baby delivery stage starts. Crowning is when your baby's scalp comes into view. Shortly afterward, your baby is born. The placenta that nourished the baby follows.

Mothers and babies are monitored closely during labor. Most women are healthy enough to have a baby through normal vaginal delivery, meaning that the baby comes down the birth canal without surgery. If there are complications, the baby may need to be delivered surgically by a Cesarean section.

Dept. of Health and Human Services Office on Women's Health

  • After vaginal delivery - in the hospital
  • Am I in labor?
  • Assisted delivery with forceps
  • Creating a birth plan
  • Delivery presentations
  • Delivery presentations
  • Epidural block
  • Episiotomy
  • Episotomy - aftercare
  • Inducing labor
  • Managing pain during labor
  • Premature rupture of membranes
  • Spinal and epidural anesthesia
  • Strategies for getting through labor
  • Tips for labor coaches
  • Vacuum-assisted delivery
  • Vaginal birth after C-section
  • Vaginal delivery - discharge
  • What to include in your birth plan
  • What you should bring to your labor and delivery

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