ICD-9 Diagnosis Code V19.11

Family history glaucoma

Diagnosis Code V19.11

ICD-9: V19.11
Short Description: Family history glaucoma
Long Description: Family history of glaucoma
This is the 2014 version of the ICD-9-CM diagnosis code V19.11

Code Classification
  • Supplementary classification of factors influencing health status and contact with health services
    • Persons with potential health hazards related to personal and family history (V10-V19)
      • V19 Family history of other conditions

Information for Patients

Family History

Your family history includes health information about you and your close relatives. Families have many factors in common, including their genes, environment, and lifestyle. Looking at these factors can help you figure out whether you have a higher risk for certain health problems, such as heart disease, stroke, and cancer.

Having a family member with a disease raises your risk, but it does not mean that you will definitely get it. Knowing that you are at risk gives you a chance to reduce that risk by following a healthier lifestyle and getting tested as needed.

You can get started by talking to your relatives about their health. Draw a family tree and add the health information. Having copies of medical records and death certificates is also helpful.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

  • Family History Is Important for Your Health (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)

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Glaucoma is a group of diseases that can damage the eye's optic nerve. It is a leading cause of blindness in the United States. It usually happens when the fluid pressure inside the eyes slowly rises, damaging the optic nerve. Often there are no symptoms at first. Without treatment, people with glaucoma will slowly lose their peripheral, or side vision. They seem to be looking through a tunnel. Over time, straight-ahead vision may decrease until no vision remains.

A comprehensive eye exam can tell if you have glaucoma. People at risk should get eye exams at least every two years. They include

  • African Americans over age 40
  • People over age 60, especially Mexican Americans
  • People with a family history of glaucoma

There is no cure, but glaucoma can usually be controlled. Early treatment can help protect your eyes against vision loss. Treatments usually include prescription eyedrops and/or surgery.

NIH: National Eye Institute

  • Glaucoma
  • Ophthalmoscopy
  • Standard ophthalmic exam
  • Tonometry

[Read More]
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