ICD-9 Diagnosis Code V17.89

Fam hx musculosk dis NEC

Diagnosis Code V17.89

ICD-9: V17.89
Short Description: Fam hx musculosk dis NEC
Long Description: Family history of other musculoskeletal diseases
This is the 2014 version of the ICD-9-CM diagnosis code V17.89

Code Classification
  • Supplementary classification of factors influencing health status and contact with health services
    • Persons with potential health hazards related to personal and family history (V10-V19)
      • V17 Family history of certain chronic disabling diseases

Information for Medical Professionals

Convert to ICD-10 Additional informationCallout TooltipGeneral Equivalence Map
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.
  • Z82.69 - Family history of diseases of the ms sys and connective tiss

  • Congenital myasthenia
  • Family history of backache
  • Family history of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis
  • Family history of osteopenia
  • Family history of scoliosis deformity of spine
  • Family history of synovial cyst of popliteal space
  • Family history: Ankylosing spondylitis
  • Family history: Cholinesterase deficiency
  • Family history: Congenital orthopedic anomaly
  • Family history: Fragility fracture
  • Family history: Hip fracture in first degree relative
  • Family history: Maternal hip fracture
  • Family history: maternal hip fracture before age 75
  • Family history: Muscular dystrophy
  • Family history: Musculoskeletal disease
  • Family history: Osteoarthritis
  • Maternal history of congenital dislocated hip

Index of Diseases and Injuries
References found for the code V17.89 in the Index of Diseases and Injuries:

Information for Patients

Bone Diseases

Your bones help you move, give you shape and support your body. They are living tissues that rebuild constantly throughout your life. During childhood and your teens, your body adds new bone faster than it removes old bone. After about age 20, you can lose bone faster than you make bone. To have strong bones when you are young, and to prevent bone loss when you are older, you need to get enough calcium, vitamin D and exercise.

There are many kinds of bone problems:

  • Low bone density and osteoporosis, which make your bones weak and more likely to break
  • Osteogenesis imperfecta makes your bones brittle
  • Paget's disease of bone makes them weak
  • Bone disease can make bones easy to break
  • Bones can also develop cancer and infections
  • Other bone diseases are caused by poor nutrition, genetic factors or problems with the rate of bone growth or rebuilding

NIH: National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases

  • ALP - blood test
  • ALP isoenzyme test
  • Blount's disease
  • Bone lesion biopsy
  • Bone pain or tenderness
  • Bone tumor
  • Bowlegs
  • Calcium blood test
  • Craniotabes
  • Fibrous dysplasia
  • Osteomalacia
  • Osteopenia - premature infants
  • Skeletal limb abnormalities
  • X-ray - skeleton

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Family History

Your family history includes health information about you and your close relatives. Families have many factors in common, including their genes, environment, and lifestyle. Looking at these factors can help you figure out whether you have a higher risk for certain health problems, such as heart disease, stroke, and cancer.

Having a family member with a disease raises your risk, but it does not mean that you will definitely get it. Knowing that you are at risk gives you a chance to reduce that risk by following a healthier lifestyle and getting tested as needed.

You can get started by talking to your relatives about their health. Draw a family tree and add the health information. Having copies of medical records and death certificates is also helpful.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

  • Family History Is Important for Your Health (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)

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Muscle Disorders

Also called: Myopathy

Your muscles help you move and help your body work. Different types of muscles have different jobs. There are many problems that can affect muscles. Muscle disorders can cause weakness, pain or even paralysis.

Causes of muscle disorders include

  • Injury or overuse, such as sprains or strains, cramps or tendinitis
  • A genetic disorder, such as muscular dystrophy
  • Some cancers
  • Inflammation, such as myositis
  • Diseases of nerves that affect muscles
  • Infections
  • Certain medicines

Sometimes the cause is not known.

  • Caring for muscle spasticity or spasms
  • Compartment syndrome
  • Contracture deformity
  • Creatine phosphokinase test
  • Electromyography
  • Eyelid twitch
  • Hypotonia
  • Muscle aches
  • Muscle atrophy
  • Muscle biopsy
  • Muscle function loss
  • Muscle twitching
  • Myopathic changes
  • Myotonia congenita
  • Rhabdomyolysis
  • Volkmann ischemic contracture
  • Weakness

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