ICD-9 Diagnosis Code V17.5

Family hx-asthma

Diagnosis Code V17.5

ICD-9: V17.5
Short Description: Family hx-asthma
Long Description: Family history of asthma
This is the 2014 version of the ICD-9-CM diagnosis code V17.5

Code Classification
  • Supplementary classification of factors influencing health status and contact with health services
    • Persons with potential health hazards related to personal and family history (V10-V19)
      • V17 Family history of certain chronic disabling diseases

Information for Patients


Asthma is a chronic disease that affects your airways. Your airways are tubes that carry air in and out of your lungs. If you have asthma, the inside walls of your airways become sore and swollen. That makes them very sensitive, and they may react strongly to things that you are allergic to or find irritating. When your airways react, they get narrower and your lungs get less air.

Symptoms of asthma include

  • Wheezing
  • Coughing, especially early in the morning or at night
  • Chest tightness
  • Shortness of breath

Not all people who have asthma have these symptoms. Having these symptoms doesn't always mean that you have asthma. Your doctor will diagnose asthma based on lung function tests, your medical history, and a physical exam. You may also have allergy tests.

When your asthma symptoms become worse than usual, it's called an asthma attack. Severe asthma attacks may require emergency care, and they can be fatal.

Asthma is treated with two kinds of medicines: quick-relief medicines to stop asthma symptoms and long-term control medicines to prevent symptoms.

NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

  • Allergies, asthma, and dust
  • Allergies, asthma, and molds
  • Allergies, asthma, and pollen
  • Asthma
  • Asthma - control drugs
  • Asthma - quick-relief drugs
  • Exercise-induced asthma
  • How to breathe when you are short of breath
  • How to use a nebulizer
  • How to use an inhaler - no spacer
  • How to use an inhaler - with spacer
  • How to use your peak flow meter
  • Make peak flow a habit!
  • Occupational asthma
  • Pulmonary function tests
  • Signs of an asthma attack
  • Smoking and asthma
  • Stay away from asthma triggers
  • Traveling with breathing problems
  • Wheezing

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Family History

Your family history includes health information about you and your close relatives. Families have many factors in common, including their genes, environment, and lifestyle. Looking at these factors can help you figure out whether you have a higher risk for certain health problems, such as heart disease, stroke, and cancer.

Having a family member with a disease raises your risk, but it does not mean that you will definitely get it. Knowing that you are at risk gives you a chance to reduce that risk by following a healthier lifestyle and getting tested as needed.

You can get started by talking to your relatives about their health. Draw a family tree and add the health information. Having copies of medical records and death certificates is also helpful.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

  • Family History Is Important for Your Health (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)

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