ICD-9 Diagnosis Code V16.42

Fm hx prostate malig

Diagnosis Code V16.42

ICD-9: V16.42
Short Description: Fm hx prostate malig
Long Description: Family history of malignant neoplasm of prostate
This is the 2014 version of the ICD-9-CM diagnosis code V16.42

Code Classification
  • Supplementary classification of factors influencing health status and contact with health services
    • Persons with potential health hazards related to personal and family history (V10-V19)
      • V16 Family history of malignant neoplasm

Information for Patients

Family History

Your family history includes health information about you and your close relatives. Families have many factors in common, including their genes, environment, and lifestyle. Looking at these factors can help you figure out whether you have a higher risk for certain health problems, such as heart disease, stroke, and cancer.

Having a family member with a disease raises your risk, but it does not mean that you will definitely get it. Knowing that you are at risk gives you a chance to reduce that risk by following a healthier lifestyle and getting tested as needed.

You can get started by talking to your relatives about their health. Draw a family tree and add the health information. Having copies of medical records and death certificates is also helpful.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

  • Family History Is Important for Your Health (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)

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Prostate Cancer

The prostate is the gland below a man's bladder that produces fluid for semen. Prostate cancer is common among older men. It is rare in men younger than 40. Risk factors for developing prostate cancer include being over 65 years of age, family history, and being African-American.

Symptoms of prostate cancer may include

  • Problems passing urine, such as pain, difficulty starting or stopping the stream, or dribbling
  • Low back pain
  • Pain with ejaculation

To diagnose prostate cancer, you doctor may do a digital rectal exam to feel the prostate for lumps or anything unusual. You may also get a blood test for prostate-specific antigen (PSA). These tests are also used in prostate cancer screening, which looks for cancer before you have symptoms. If your results are abnormal, you may need more tests, such as an ultrasound, MRI, or biopsy.

Treatment often depends on the stage of the cancer. How fast the cancer grows and how different it is from surrounding tissue helps determine the stage. Men with prostate cancer have many treatment options. The treatment that's best for one man may not be best for another. The options include watchful waiting, surgery, radiation therapy, hormone therapy, and chemotherapy. You may have a combination of treatments.

NIH: National Cancer Institute

  • After chemotherapy - discharge
  • Digital rectal exam
  • Pelvic (between the hips) radiation - discharge
  • Prostate brachytherapy
  • Prostate brachytherapy - discharge
  • Prostate cancer
  • Prostate cancer - treatment
  • Prostate cancer staging
  • Prostate radiation - discharge
  • Radical prostatectomy
  • Radical prostatectomy - discharge
  • Understanding Chemotherapy - NIH - Easy-to-Read (National Cancer Institute)
  • What to Know about Brachytherapy (A Type of Internal Radiation Therapy) - NIH - Easy-to-Read (National Cancer Institute)
  • What to Know about External Beam Radiation Therapy - NIH - Easy-to-Read (National Cancer Institute)

[Read More]
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