ICD-9 Diagnosis Code V16.3

Family hx-breast malig

Diagnosis Code V16.3

ICD-9: V16.3
Short Description: Family hx-breast malig
Long Description: Family history of malignant neoplasm of breast
This is the 2014 version of the ICD-9-CM diagnosis code V16.3

Code Classification
  • Supplementary classification of factors influencing health status and contact with health services
    • Persons with potential health hazards related to personal and family history (V10-V19)
      • V16 Family history of malignant neoplasm

Information for Patients

Breast Cancer

Breast cancer affects one in eight women during their lives. Breast cancer kills more women in the United States than any cancer except lung cancer. No one knows why some women get breast cancer, but there are a number of risk factors. Risks that you cannot change include

  • Age - the chance of getting breast cancer rises as a woman gets older
  • Genes - there are two genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2, that greatly increase the risk. Women who have family members with breast or ovarian cancer may wish to be tested.
  • Personal factors - beginning periods before age 12 or going through menopause after age 55

Other risks include being overweight, using hormone replacement therapy (also called menopausal hormone therapy), taking birth control pills, drinking alcohol, not having children or having your first child after age 35 or having dense breasts.

Symptoms of breast cancer may include a lump in the breast, a change in size or shape of the breast or discharge from a nipple. Breast self-exam and mammography can help find breast cancer early when it is most treatable. Treatment may consist of radiation, lumpectomy, mastectomy, chemotherapy and hormone therapy.

Men can have breast cancer, too, but the number of cases is small.

NIH: National Cancer Institute

  • After chemotherapy - discharge
  • BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene testing
  • Breast biopsy -- stereotactic
  • Breast biopsy -- ultrasound
  • Breast cancer
  • Breast cancer screenings
  • Breast lump
  • Breast MRI scan
  • Breast PET scan
  • Breast radiation - discharge
  • Breast self exam
  • Breast ultrasound
  • Chest radiation - discharge
  • Lymphedema
  • Mammography
  • Understanding Chemotherapy - NIH - Easy-to-Read (National Cancer Institute)
  • Understanding your breast cancer risk
  • What to Know about Brachytherapy (A Type of Internal Radiation Therapy) - NIH - Easy-to-Read (National Cancer Institute)
  • What to Know about External Beam Radiation Therapy - NIH - Easy-to-Read (National Cancer Institute)

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Family History

Your family history includes health information about you and your close relatives. Families have many factors in common, including their genes, environment, and lifestyle. Looking at these factors can help you figure out whether you have a higher risk for certain health problems, such as heart disease, stroke, and cancer.

Having a family member with a disease raises your risk, but it does not mean that you will definitely get it. Knowing that you are at risk gives you a chance to reduce that risk by following a healthier lifestyle and getting tested as needed.

You can get started by talking to your relatives about their health. Draw a family tree and add the health information. Having copies of medical records and death certificates is also helpful.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

  • Family History Is Important for Your Health (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)

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