ICD-9 Diagnosis Code 996.76

Comp-genitourin dev/grft

Diagnosis Code 996.76

ICD-9: 996.76
Short Description: Comp-genitourin dev/grft
Long Description: Other complications due to genitourinary device, implant, and graft
This is the 2014 version of the ICD-9-CM diagnosis code 996.76

Code Classification
  • Injury and poisoning
    • Complications of surgical and medical care, not elsewhere classified (996-999)
      • 996 Complications peculiar to certain specified procedures

Information for Medical Professionals

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The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

  • Bleeding due to intrauterine contraceptive device
  • Blocked ureteric stent
  • Burst balloon of self-retaining catheter
  • Complication associated with genitourinary device
  • Complication of urinary catheter
  • Disorder of cystostomy catheter
  • Disorder of implanted penile prosthesis
  • Disorder of intrauterine contraceptive device
  • Disorder of testicular prosthesis
  • Disorder of urethral catheter
  • Disorder of urinary sphincter implant
  • Disorder of urological anastomosis
  • Disorder of urological stoma
  • Displacement of nephrostomy tube
  • Displacement of penile prosthesis
  • Obstruction of urinary catheter
  • Pregnancy on intrauterine device
  • Problem with vaginal pessary
  • Retained intrauterine contraceptive device
  • Retained intrauterine contraceptive device in pregnancy
  • Retained ureteric catheter
  • Retained ureteric stent
  • Testicular prosthesis displacement
  • Testicular prosthesis extrusion
  • Unsuccessful intrauterine contraceptive device insertion
  • Unsuccessful intrauterine contraceptive device removal
  • Urostomy stomal prolapse

Index of Diseases and Injuries
References found for the code 996.76 in the Index of Diseases and Injuries:

Information for Patients

Bladder Diseases

The bladder is a hollow organ in your lower abdomen that stores urine. Many conditions can affect your bladder. Some common ones are

  • Cystitis - inflammation of the bladder, often from an infection
  • Urinary incontinence - loss of bladder control
  • Overactive bladder - a condition in which the bladder squeezes urine out at the wrong time
  • Interstitial cystitis - a chronic problem that causes bladder pain and frequent, urgent urination
  • Bladder cancer

Doctors diagnose bladder diseases using different tests. These include urine tests, x-rays, and an examination of the bladder wall with a scope called a cystoscope. Treatment depends on the cause of the problem. It may include medicines and, in severe cases, surgery.

NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

  • Bladder biopsy
  • Bladder outlet obstruction
  • Bladder stones
  • Cystitis - noninfectious
  • Cystometric study
  • Indwelling catheter care
  • Kegel exercises - self-care
  • Neurogenic bladder
  • Radionuclide cystogram
  • Retrograde cystography
  • Self catheterization - female
  • Self catheterization - male
  • Suprapubic catheter care
  • Traumatic injury of the bladder and urethra
  • Urinary catheters
  • Urinary incontinence products - self-care
  • Urinary Retention - NIH (National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases)
  • Urine drainage bags
  • Urostomy - stoma and skin care
  • Voiding cystourethrogram

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Urinary Tract Infections

Also called: UTI

The urinary system is the body's drainage system for removing wastes and extra water. It includes two kidneys, two ureters, a bladder, and a urethra. Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are the second most common type of infection in the body.

You may have a UTI if you notice

  • Pain or burning when you urinate
  • Fever, tiredness or shakiness
  • An urge to urinate often
  • Pressure in your lower belly
  • Urine that smells bad or looks cloudy or reddish
  • Pain in your back or side below the ribs

People of any age or sex can get UTIs. But about four times as many women get UTIs as men. You're also at higher risk if you have diabetes, need a tube to drain your bladder, or have a spinal cord injury.

If you think you have a UTI it is important to see your doctor. Your doctor can tell if you have a UTI with a urine test. Treatment is with antibiotics.

NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

  • Asymptomatic bacteriuria
  • Catheter-associated UTI
  • Cystitis - acute bacterial
  • Leukocyte esterase
  • Radionuclide cystogram
  • Retrograde cystography
  • Ureteroscopy
  • Urinary tract infection - adults
  • Urinary tract infection - children
  • Urinary tract infection in children - aftercare
  • Urine culture
  • Voiding cystourethrogram

[Read More]
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