ICD-9 Diagnosis Code 963.5

Poisoning-vitamins NEC

Diagnosis Code 963.5

ICD-9: 963.5
Short Description: Poisoning-vitamins NEC
Long Description: Poisoning by vitamins, not elsewhere classified
This is the 2014 version of the ICD-9-CM diagnosis code 963.5

Code Classification
  • Injury and poisoning
    • Poisoning by drugs, medicinals and biological substances (960-979)
      • 963 Poisoning by primarily systemic agents

Information for Medical Professionals

Convert to ICD-10 Additional informationCallout TooltipGeneral Equivalence Map
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

  • Accidental vitamin A overdose
  • Accidental vitamin A poisoning
  • Accidental vitamin D overdose
  • Accidental vitamin D poisoning
  • Acitretin overdose of undetermined intent
  • Ascorbic acid toxicity
  • Cholecalciferol toxicity
  • Intentional acitretin overdose
  • Intentional etretinate overdose
  • Intentional vitamin A overdose
  • Intentional vitamin A poisoning
  • Intentional vitamin D overdose
  • Intentional vitamin D poisoning
  • Poisoning by vitamin
  • Poisoning by vitamin A
  • Poisoning by vitamin D
  • Pyridoxine toxicity
  • Vitamin A overdose
  • Vitamin A overdose of undetermined intent
  • Vitamin B group poisoning
  • Vitamin D overdose
  • Vitamin D overdose of undetermined intent
  • Vitamin D poisoning of undetermined intent
  • Vitamin overdose

Index of Diseases and Injuries
References found for the code 963.5 in the Index of Diseases and Injuries:

Information for Patients

Drug Reactions

Also called: Side effects

Most of the time, medicines make our lives better. They reduce aches and pains, fight infections, and control problems such as high blood pressure or diabetes. But medicines can also cause unwanted reactions.

One problem is interactions, which may occur between

  • Two drugs, such as aspirin and blood thinners
  • Drugs and food, such as statins and grapefruit
  • Drugs and supplements, such as gingko and blood thinners
  • Drugs and diseases, such as aspirin and peptic ulcers

Interactions can change the actions of one or both drugs. The drugs might not work, or you could get side effects.

Side effects are unwanted effects caused by the drugs. Most are mild, such as a stomach aches or drowsiness, and go away after you stop taking the drug. Others can be more serious.

Drug allergies are another type of reaction. They can be mild or life-threatening. Skin reactions, such as hives and rashes, are the most common type. Anaphylaxis, a serious allergic reaction, is more rare.

When you start a new prescription or over-the-counter medication, make sure you understand how to take it correctly. Know which other medications and foods you need to avoid. Ask your health care provider or pharmacist if you have questions.

  • Angioedema
  • Drug allergies
  • Drug-induced diarrhea
  • Drug-induced tremor
  • Taking multiple medicines safely

[Read More]

Medication Errors

Medicines cure infectious diseases, prevent problems from chronic diseases, and ease pain. But medicines can also cause harmful reactions if not used correctly. Errors can happen in the hospital, at the doctor's office, at the pharmacy, or at home. You can help prevent errors by

  • Knowing your medicines. Keep a list of the names of your medicines, how much you take, and when you take them. Include over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and supplements and herbs. Take this list to all your doctor visits.
  • Reading medicine labels and following the directions. Don't take medications prescribed for someone else.
  • Taking extra caution when giving medicines to children.
  • Asking questions. If you don't know the answers to these questions, ask your doctor or pharmacist.
    • Why am I taking this medicine?
    • What are the common problems to watch out for?
    • What should I do if they occur?
    • When should I stop this medicine?
    • Can I take this medicine with the other medicines on my list?

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

  • 6 Tips to Avoid Medication Mistakes (Food and Drug Administration)
  • Help prevent hospital errors
  • Keeping your medications organized
  • Medication safety during your hospital stay
  • Medication safety: Filling your prescription
  • Storing your medicines
  • Taking medicine at home - create a routine

[Read More]


Vitamins are substances that your body needs to grow and develop normally. There are 13 vitamins your body needs. They are

  • Vitamin A
  • B vitamins (thiamine, riboflavin, niacin, pantothenic acid, biotin, vitamin B-6, vitamin B-12 and folate)
  • Vitamin C
  • Vitamin D
  • Vitamin E
  • Vitamin K

You can usually get all your vitamins from the foods you eat. Your body can also make vitamins D and K. People who eat a vegetarian diet may need to take a vitamin B12 supplement.

Each vitamin has specific jobs. If you have low levels of certain vitamins, you may get health problems. For example, if you don't get enough vitamin C, you could become anemic. Some vitamins may help prevent medical problems. Vitamin A prevents night blindness.

The best way to get enough vitamins is to eat a balanced diet with a variety of foods. In some cases, you may need to take vitamin supplements. It's a good idea to ask your health care provider first. High doses of some vitamins can cause problems.

  • Vitamins

[Read More]
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