ICD-9 Diagnosis Code 795.15

Vag hi risk HPV-DNA pos

Diagnosis Code 795.15

ICD-9: 795.15
Short Description: Vag hi risk HPV-DNA pos
Long Description: Vaginal high risk human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA test positive
This is the 2014 version of the ICD-9-CM diagnosis code 795.15

Code Classification
  • Symptoms, signs, and ill-defined conditions
    • Nonspecific abnormal findings (790-796)
      • 795 Nonspecific abnormal histological and immunological findings

Information for Medical Professionals

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Index of Diseases and Injuries
References found for the code 795.15 in the Index of Diseases and Injuries:

Information for Patients


Also called: Human papillomavirus

Human papillomaviruses (HPV) are common viruses that can cause warts. There are more than 100 types of HPV. Most are harmless, but about 30 types put you at risk for cancer. These types affect the genitals and you get them through sexual contact with an infected partner. They can be either low-risk or high-risk. Low-risk HPV can cause genital warts. High-risk HPV can lead to cancers of the cervix, vulva, vagina, and anus in women. In men, it can lead to cancers of the anus and penis.

Although some people develop genital warts from HPV infection, others have no symptoms. Your health care provider can treat or remove the warts. In women, Pap tests can detect changes in the cervix that might lead to cancer. Both Pap and HPV tests are types of cervical cancer screening.

Correct usage of latex condoms greatly reduces, but does not eliminate, the risk of catching or spreading HPV. Vaccines can protect against several types of HPV, including some that can cause cancer.

NIH: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

  • Cervical cancer -- screening and prevention
  • Condom Fact Sheet in Brief (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
  • HPV and Cancer (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
  • HPV DNA test
  • HPV vaccine
  • HPV Vaccine - Cervarix: What You Need to Know (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
  • HPV Vaccine - Gardasil: What You Need to Know (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
  • HPV Vaccine Gardasil®-9: What You Need to Know
  • Pap and HPV Testing - NIH (National Cancer Institute)

[Read More]

Vaginal Cancer

Vaginal cancer is a rare type of cancer. It is more common in women 60 and older. You are also more likely to get it if you have had a human papillomavirus (HPV) infection or if your mother took diethylstilbestrol (DES) when she was pregnant. Doctors prescribed DES in the 1950's to prevent miscarriages. You are also at higher risk if you have had abnormal cells in the vagina, cervix, or uterus.

It often doesn't have early symptoms. However, see your doctor if you notice

  • Bleeding that is not your period
  • A vaginal lump
  • Pelvic pain

A Pap test can find abnormal cells that may be cancer. Vaginal cancer can often be cured in its early stages. Treatment might include surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy.

NIH: National Cancer Institute

  • After chemotherapy - discharge
  • Pelvic (between the hips) radiation - discharge
  • Understanding Chemotherapy - NIH - Easy-to-Read (National Cancer Institute)
  • Vaginal and Vulvar Cancer (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
  • Vaginal tumors
  • What to Know about External Beam Radiation Therapy - NIH - Easy-to-Read (National Cancer Institute)

[Read More]

Vaginal Diseases

Vaginal problems are some of the most common reasons women go to the doctor. They may have symptoms such as

  • Itching
  • Burning
  • Pain
  • Abnormal bleeding
  • Discharge

Often, the problem is vaginitis, an inflammation of the vagina. The main symptom is smelly vaginal discharge, but some women have no symptoms. Common causes are bacterial infections, trichomoniasis, and yeast infections.

Some other causes of vaginal symptoms include sexually transmitted diseases, vaginal cancer, and vulvar cancer. Treatment of vaginal problems depends on the cause.

  • Bacterial Vaginosis (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
  • Bacterial vaginosis -- aftercare
  • Bartholin's abscess
  • Culture - endocervix
  • Endocervical gram stain
  • Imperforate hymen
  • Vaginal cysts
  • Vaginal discharge
  • Vaginal dryness
  • Vaginal itching
  • Vaginal yeast infection
  • Vaginitis - self-care
  • Vaginitis test - wet mount
  • Vulvovaginitis

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