ICD-9 Diagnosis Code 779.2

Cns dysfunction syn NB

Diagnosis Code 779.2

ICD-9: 779.2
Short Description: Cns dysfunction syn NB
Long Description: Cerebral depression, coma, and other abnormal cerebral signs in fetus or newborn
This is the 2014 version of the ICD-9-CM diagnosis code 779.2

Code Classification
  • Certain conditions originating in the perinatal period
    • Other conditions originating in the perinatal period (764-779)
      • 779 Other and ill-defined conditions originating in the perinatal period

Information for Medical Professionals

Code Edits
The following edits are applicable to this code:
Newborn diagnoses Additional informationCallout TooltipNewborn diagnoses
Newborn diagnoses: Age of 0 years; a subset of diagnoses intended only for newborns and neonates.

Convert to ICD-10 Additional informationCallout TooltipGeneral Equivalence Map
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

Index of Diseases and Injuries
References found for the code 779.2 in the Index of Diseases and Injuries:

    • Coma 780.01
      • newborn 779.2
    • Depression 311
      • central nervous system 799.1
        • newborn 779.2
      • cerebral 331.9
        • newborn 779.2
      • cerebrovascular 437.8
        • newborn 779.2
      • medullary 348.89
        • newborn 779.2
    • Ischemia, ischemic 459.9
      • cerebral (chronic) (generalized) 437.1
        • newborn 779.2

Information for Patients

Brain Diseases

The brain is the control center of the body. It controls thoughts, memory, speech, and movement. It regulates the function of many organs. When the brain is healthy, it works quickly and automatically. However, when problems occur, the results can be devastating.

Inflammation in the brain can lead to problems such as vision loss, weakness and paralysis. Loss of brain cells, which happens if you suffer a stroke, can affect your ability to think clearly. Brain tumors can also press on nerves and affect brain function. Some brain diseases are genetic. And we do not know what causes some brain diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease.

The symptoms of brain diseases vary widely depending on the specific problem. In some cases, damage is permanent. In other cases, treatments such as surgery, medicines, or physical therapy can correct the source of the problem or improve symptoms.

  • Basal ganglia dysfunction
  • Brain abscess
  • Brain surgery
  • Brain surgery - discharge
  • Central pontine myelinolysis
  • Cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) collection
  • EEG
  • Hepatic encephalopathy
  • Hepatocerebral degeneration
  • Increased intracranial pressure
  • Intraventricular hemorrhage of the newborn
  • Pseudotumor cerebri
  • Subdural hematoma
  • Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome

[Read More]


A coma is a deep state of unconsciousness. An individual in a coma is alive but unable to move or respond to his or her environment. Coma may occur as a complication of an underlying illness, or as a result of injuries, such as brain injury.

A coma rarely lasts more than 2 to 4 weeks. The outcome for coma depends on the cause, severity, and site of the damage. People may come out of a coma with physical, intellectual, and psychological problems. Some people may remain in a coma for years or even decades. For those people, the most common cause of death is infection, such as pneumonia.

NIH: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

  • EEG

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Uncommon Infant and Newborn Problems

It can be scary when your baby is sick, especially when it is not an everyday problem like a cold or a fever. You may not know whether the problem is serious or how to treat it. If you have concerns about your baby's health, call your health care provider right away.

Learning information about your baby's condition can help ease your worry. Do not be afraid to ask questions about your baby's care. By working together with your health care provider, you make sure that your baby gets the best care possible.

  • Caput succedaneum
  • Craniotabes
  • Crying - excessive (0-6 months)
  • Failure to thrive
  • Hemorrhagic disease of the newborn
  • Home apnea monitor use - infants
  • Hyperglycemia - infants
  • Hyperviscosity - newborn
  • Hypocalcemia - infants
  • Intussusception (children)
  • Irritability
  • Neonatal respiratory distress syndrome
  • Neonatal sepsis
  • Neutropenia - infants
  • Pyloric stenosis
  • Spasmus nutans
  • Tongue tie
  • Tracheomalacia - acquired
  • Transient tachypnea - newborn

[Read More]
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