ICD-9 Diagnosis Code 775.9

Transient met dis NB NOS

Diagnosis Code 775.9

ICD-9: 775.9
Short Description: Transient met dis NB NOS
Long Description: Unspecified endocrine and metabolic disturbances specific to the fetus and newborn
This is the 2014 version of the ICD-9-CM diagnosis code 775.9

Code Classification
  • Certain conditions originating in the perinatal period
    • Other conditions originating in the perinatal period (764-779)
      • 775 Endocrine and metabolic disturbances specific to the fetus and newborn

Information for Medical Professionals

Code Edits
The following edits are applicable to this code:
Newborn diagnoses Additional informationCallout TooltipNewborn diagnoses
Newborn diagnoses: Age of 0 years; a subset of diagnoses intended only for newborns and neonates.

Convert to ICD-10 Additional informationCallout TooltipGeneral Equivalence Map
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

Index of Diseases and Injuries
References found for the code 775.9 in the Index of Diseases and Injuries:

Information for Patients

Endocrine Diseases

Your endocrine system includes eight major glands throughout your body. These glands make hormones. Hormones are chemical messengers. They travel through your bloodstream to tissues or organs. Hormones work slowly and affect body processes from head to toe. These include

  • Growth and development
  • Metabolism - digestion, elimination, breathing, blood circulation and maintaining body temperature
  • Sexual function
  • Reproduction
  • Mood

If your hormone levels are too high or too low, you may have a hormone disorder. Hormone diseases also occur if your body does not respond to hormones the way it is supposed to. Stress, infection and changes in your blood's fluid and electrolyte balance can also influence hormone levels.

In the United States, the most common endocrine disease is diabetes. There are many others. They are usually treated by controlling how much hormone your body makes. Hormone supplements can help if the problem is too little of a hormone.

  • Androgen insensitivity syndrome
  • Endocrine glands
  • Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism
  • Intersex
  • Multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) I
  • Multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) II
  • Zollinger-Ellison syndrome

[Read More]

Metabolic Disorders

Metabolism is the process your body uses to get or make energy from the food you eat. Food is made up of proteins, carbohydrates, and fats. Chemicals in your digestive system break the food parts down into sugars and acids, your body's fuel. Your body can use this fuel right away, or it can store the energy in your body tissues, such as your liver, muscles, and body fat.

A metabolic disorder occurs when abnormal chemical reactions in your body disrupt this process. When this happens, you might have too much of some substances or too little of other ones that you need to stay healthy.

You can develop a metabolic disorder when some organs, such as your liver or pancreas, become diseased or do not function normally. Diabetes is an example.

  • Acid mucopolysaccharides
  • Acidosis
  • Alkalosis
  • Homocystinuria
  • Lactic acid test
  • Metabolic acidosis
  • Metabolic neuropathies
  • Pseudohypoparathyroidism
  • Sanfilippo syndrome

[Read More]

Uncommon Infant and Newborn Problems

It can be scary when your baby is sick, especially when it is not an everyday problem like a cold or a fever. You may not know whether the problem is serious or how to treat it. If you have concerns about your baby's health, call your health care provider right away.

Learning information about your baby's condition can help ease your worry. Do not be afraid to ask questions about your baby's care. By working together with your health care provider, you make sure that your baby gets the best care possible.

  • Caput succedaneum
  • Craniotabes
  • Crying - excessive (0-6 months)
  • Failure to thrive
  • Hemorrhagic disease of the newborn
  • Home apnea monitor use - infants
  • Hyperglycemia - infants
  • Hyperviscosity - newborn
  • Hypocalcemia - infants
  • Intussusception (children)
  • Irritability
  • Neonatal respiratory distress syndrome
  • Neonatal sepsis
  • Neutropenia - infants
  • Pyloric stenosis
  • Spasmus nutans
  • Tongue tie
  • Tracheomalacia - acquired
  • Transient tachypnea - newborn

[Read More]
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