ICD-9 Diagnosis Code 771.82

NB urinary tract infectn

Diagnosis Code 771.82

ICD-9: 771.82
Short Description: NB urinary tract infectn
Long Description: Urinary tract infection of newborn
This is the 2014 version of the ICD-9-CM diagnosis code 771.82

Code Classification
  • Certain conditions originating in the perinatal period
    • Other conditions originating in the perinatal period (764-779)
      • 771 Infections specific to the perinatal period

Information for Patients

Uncommon Infant and Newborn Problems

It can be scary when your baby is sick, especially when it is not an everyday problem like a cold or a fever. You may not know whether the problem is serious or how to treat it. If you have concerns about your baby's health, call your health care provider right away.

Learning information about your baby's condition can help ease your worry. Do not be afraid to ask questions about your baby's care. By working together with your health care provider, you make sure that your baby gets the best care possible.

  • Caput succedaneum
  • Craniotabes
  • Crying - excessive (0-6 months)
  • Failure to thrive
  • Hemorrhagic disease of the newborn
  • Home apnea monitor use - infants
  • Hyperglycemia - infants
  • Hyperviscosity - newborn
  • Hypocalcemia - infants
  • Intussusception (children)
  • Irritability
  • Neonatal respiratory distress syndrome
  • Neonatal sepsis
  • Neutropenia - infants
  • Pyloric stenosis
  • Spasmus nutans
  • Tongue tie
  • Tracheomalacia - acquired
  • Transient tachypnea - newborn

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Urinary Tract Infections

Also called: UTI

The urinary system is the body's drainage system for removing wastes and extra water. It includes two kidneys, two ureters, a bladder, and a urethra. Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are the second most common type of infection in the body.

You may have a UTI if you notice

  • Pain or burning when you urinate
  • Fever, tiredness or shakiness
  • An urge to urinate often
  • Pressure in your lower belly
  • Urine that smells bad or looks cloudy or reddish
  • Pain in your back or side below the ribs

People of any age or sex can get UTIs. But about four times as many women get UTIs as men. You're also at higher risk if you have diabetes, need a tube to drain your bladder, or have a spinal cord injury.

If you think you have a UTI it is important to see your doctor. Your doctor can tell if you have a UTI with a urine test. Treatment is with antibiotics.

NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

  • Asymptomatic bacteriuria
  • Catheter-associated UTI
  • Cystitis - acute bacterial
  • Leukocyte esterase
  • Radionuclide cystogram
  • Retrograde cystography
  • Ureteroscopy
  • Urinary tract infection - adults
  • Urinary tract infection - children
  • Urinary tract infection in children - aftercare
  • Urine culture
  • Voiding cystourethrogram

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