ICD-9 Diagnosis Code 692.77

3rd degree sunburn

Diagnosis Code 692.77

ICD-9: 692.77
Short Description: 3rd degree sunburn
Long Description: Sunburn of third degree
This is the 2014 version of the ICD-9-CM diagnosis code 692.77

Code Classification
  • Diseases of the skin and subcutaneous tissue
    • Other inflammatory conditions of skin and subcutaneous tissue (690-698)
      • 692 Contact dermatitis and other eczema

Information for Medical Professionals

Information for Patients


A burn is damage to your body's tissues caused by heat, chemicals, electricity, sunlight or radiation. Scalds from hot liquids and steam, building fires and flammable liquids and gases are the most common causes of burns. Another kind is an inhalation injury, caused by breathing smoke.

There are three types of burns:

  • First-degree burns damage only the outer layer of skin
  • Second-degree burns damage the outer layer and the layer underneath
  • Third-degree burns damage or destroy the deepest layer of skin and tissues underneath

Burns can cause swelling, blistering, scarring and, in serious cases, shock and even death. They also can lead to infections because they damage your skin's protective barrier. Treatment for burns depends on the cause of the burn, how deep it is, and how much of the body it covers. Antibiotic creams can prevent or treat infections. For more serious burns, treatment may be needed to clean the wound, replace the skin, and make sure the patient has enough fluids and nutrition.

NIH: National Institute of General Medical Sciences

  • Burns
  • Chemical burn or reaction
  • Minor burns - aftercare
  • Skin graft

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Sun Exposure

Also called: Sunburn

Ultraviolet (UV) rays are an invisible form of radiation. They can pass through your skin and damage your skin cells. Sunburns are a sign of skin damage. Suntans aren't healthy, either. They appear after the sun's rays have already killed some cells and damaged others. UV rays can cause skin damage during any season or at any temperature. They can also cause eye problems, wrinkles, skin spots, and skin cancer.

To protect yourself

  • Stay out of the sun when it is strongest (between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m.)
  • Use sunscreen with an SPF of 15 or higher
  • Wear protective clothing
  • Wear wraparound sunglasses that provide 100 percent UV ray protection
  • Avoid sunlamps and tanning beds

Check your skin regularly for changes in the size, shape, color, or feel of birthmarks, moles, and spots. Such changes are a sign of skin cancer.

Food and Drug Administration

  • Actinic keratosis
  • Polymorphic light eruption
  • Sun Safety: Save Your Skin! (Food and Drug Administration)
  • Sunburn

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