ICD-9 Diagnosis Code 674.14

Disrupt c-sect-postpart

Diagnosis Code 674.14

ICD-9: 674.14
Short Description: Disrupt c-sect-postpart
Long Description: Disruption of cesarean wound, postpartum condition or complication
This is the 2014 version of the ICD-9-CM diagnosis code 674.14

Code Classification
  • Complications of pregnancy, childbirth, and the puerperium
    • Complications of the puerperium (670-677)
      • 674 Other and unspecified complications of the puerperium, not elsewhere classified

Information for Patients

Cesarean Section

Also called: C-section

A Cesarean section (C-section) is surgery to deliver a baby. The baby is taken out through the mother's abdomen. In the United States, about one in four women have their babies this way. Most C-sections are done when unexpected problems happen during delivery. These include

  • Health problems in the mother
  • The position of the baby
  • Not enough room for the baby to go through the vagina
  • Signs of distress in the baby

C-sections are also more common among women carrying more than one baby.

The surgery is relatively safe for mother and baby. Still, it is major surgery and carries risks. It also takes longer to recover from a C-section than from vaginal birth. After healing, the incision may leave a weak spot in the wall of the uterus. This could cause problems with an attempted vaginal birth later. However, more than half of women who have a C-section can give vaginal birth later.

  • After a C-section - in the hospital
  • C-section
  • Going home after a C-section
  • Vaginal birth after C-section

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Postpartum Care

Also called: Post-pregnancy health

Taking home a new baby is one of the happiest times in a woman's life. But it also presents both physical and emotional challenges.

  • Get as much rest as possible. You may find that all you can do is eat, sleep, and care for your baby. And that is perfectly okay. You will have spotting or bleeding, like a menstrual period, off and on for up to six weeks.
  • You might also have swelling in your legs and feet, feel constipated, have menstrual-like cramping. Even if you are not breastfeeding, you can have milk leaking from your nipples, and your breasts might feel full, tender, or uncomfortable.
  • Follow your doctor's instructions on how much activity, like climbing stairs or walking, you can do for the next few weeks.
  • Doctors usually recommend that you abstain from sexual intercourse for four to six weeks after birth.

In addition to physical changes, you may feel sad or have the "baby blues." If you are extremely sad or are unable to care for yourself or your baby, you might have a serious condition called postpartum depression.

Dept. of Health and Human Services Office on Women's Health

  • After vaginal delivery - in the hospital
  • Losing weight after pregnancy
  • Vaginal delivery - discharge

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Wounds and Injuries

Also called: Traumatic injuries

An injury is damage to your body. It is a general term that refers to harm caused by accidents, falls, hits, weapons, and more. In the U.S., millions of people injure themselves every year. These injuries range from minor to life-threatening. Injuries can happen at work or play, indoors or outdoors, driving a car, or walking across the street.

Wounds are injuries that break the skin or other body tissues. They include cuts, scrapes, scratches, and punctured skin. They often happen because of an accident, but surgery, sutures, and stitches also cause wounds. Minor wounds usually aren't serious, but it is important to clean them. Serious and infected wounds may require first aid followed by a visit to your doctor. You should also seek attention if the wound is deep, you cannot close it yourself, you cannot stop the bleeding or get the dirt out, or it does not heal.

Other common types of injuries include

  • Bruises
  • Burns
  • Dislocations
  • Fractures
  • Sprains and strains

  • Amputation - traumatic
  • Animal bites -- self-care
  • Bleeding
  • Closed suction drain with bulb
  • Crush injury
  • Cuts and puncture wounds
  • Electrical injury
  • Gunshot wounds -- aftercare
  • Hemovac drain
  • How wounds heal
  • Human bites -- self-care
  • Laceration - sutures or staples - at home
  • Lacerations - liquid bandage
  • Nail injuries
  • Skin flaps and grafts -- self-care
  • Sterile technique
  • Sternal exploration or closure
  • Surgical wound care
  • Surgical wound care -- closed
  • Surgical wound infection - treatment
  • Wet to dry dressing changes
  • Wound care centers

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