ICD-9 Diagnosis Code 659.20

Pyrexia in labor-unspec

Diagnosis Code 659.20

ICD-9: 659.20
Short Description: Pyrexia in labor-unspec
Long Description: Maternal pyrexia during labor, unspecified, unspecified as to episode of care or not applicable
This is the 2014 version of the ICD-9-CM diagnosis code 659.20

Code Classification
  • Complications of pregnancy, childbirth, and the puerperium
    • Normal delivery, and other indications for care in pregnancy, labor, and delivery (650-659)
      • 659 Other indications for care or intervention related to labor and delivery and not elsewhere classified

Information for Patients

Childbirth Problems

While childbirth usually goes well, complications can happen. They can cause a risk to the mother, baby, or both. Possible complications include

  • Preterm (premature) labor, when labor starts before 37 completed weeks of pregnancy
  • Problems with the umbilical cord
  • Problems with the position of the baby, such as breech, in which the baby is going to come out feet first
  • Birth injuries

For some of these problems, the baby may need to be delivered surgically by a Cesarean section.

  • Assisted delivery with forceps
  • Brachial plexus injury in newborns
  • Breech birth
  • Caput succedaneum
  • Fractured clavicle in the newborn
  • Meconium aspiration syndrome
  • Placenta previa
  • Premature rupture of membranes
  • Sheehan syndrome
  • Vacuum-assisted delivery
  • When you pass your due date

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Also called: Pyrexia

A fever is a body temperature that is higher than normal. It is not an illness. It is part of your body's defense against infection. Most bacteria and viruses that cause infections do well at the body's normal temperature (98.6 F). A slight fever can make it harder for them to survive. Fever also activates your body's immune system.

Infections cause most fevers. There can be many other causes, including

  • Medicines
  • Heat exhaustion
  • Cancers
  • Autoimmune diseases

Treatment depends on the cause of your fever. Your health care provider may recommend using over-the-counter medicines such as acetaminophen or ibuprofen to lower a very high fever. Adults can also take aspirin, but children with fevers should not take aspirin. It is also important to drink enough liquids to prevent dehydration.

  • Familial Mediterranean fever
  • Fever
  • When your baby or infant has a fever

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