ICD-9 Diagnosis Code 656.41

Intrauter death-deliver

Diagnosis Code 656.41

ICD-9: 656.41
Short Description: Intrauter death-deliver
Long Description: Intrauterine death, affecting management of mother, delivered, with or without mention of antepartum condition
This is the 2014 version of the ICD-9-CM diagnosis code 656.41

Code Classification
  • Complications of pregnancy, childbirth, and the puerperium (630–679)
    • Normal delivery, and other indications for care in pregnancy, labor, and delivery (650-659)
      • 656 Other fetal and placental problems affecting management of mother

Information for Patients


Miscarriage

Also called: Spontaneous abortion

A miscarriage is the loss of pregnancy from natural causes before the 20th week of pregnancy. Most miscarriages occur very early in the pregnancy, often before a woman even knows she is pregnant. There are many different causes for a miscarriage. In most cases, there is nothing you can do to prevent a miscarriage.

Factors that may contribute to miscarriage include

  • A genetic problem with the fetus. This is the most common cause in the first trimester.
  • Problems with the uterus or cervix. These contribute in the second trimester.
  • Polycystic ovary syndrome

Signs of a miscarriage can include vaginal spotting or bleeding, abdominal pain or cramping, and fluid or tissue passing from the vagina. Although vaginal bleeding is a common symptom of miscarriage, many women have spotting early in their pregnancy but do not miscarry. But if you are pregnant and have bleeding or spotting, contact your health care provider immediately.

Women who miscarry early in their pregnancy usually do not need any treatment. In some cases, you may need a procedure called a dilatation and curettage (D&C) to remove tissue remaining in the uterus.

Counseling may help you cope with your grief. Later, if you do decide to try again, work closely with your health care provider to lower the risks. Many women who have a miscarriage go on to have healthy babies.

NIH: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

  • Choriocarcinoma
  • D and C
  • HCG blood test - quantitative
  • Miscarriage
  • Miscarriage - threatened
  • Serum progesterone


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Stillbirth

If a woman loses a pregnancy after she's past her 20th week, it's called a stillbirth. Stillbirths are due to natural causes. They can happen before delivery or during delivery. Causes include:

  • Problems with the placenta, the organ that transports oxygen and nutrients to the fetus
  • Genetic problems with the fetus
  • Fetal infections
  • Other physical problems in the fetus

In at least half of all cases, it is not possible to tell why the baby died.

If stillbirth happens before delivery, your health care provider may induce labor or perform a Cesarean section to deliver the fetus. In some cases, you can wait until you go into labor yourself. This usually happens within two weeks of stillbirth.

Counseling may help you cope with your grief. Later, if you do decide to try again, work closely with your health care provider to lower the risks. Many women who have a stillbirth go on to have healthy babies.

NIH: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

  • When your baby is stillborn


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