ICD-9 Diagnosis Code 595.82

Irradiation cystitis

Diagnosis Code 595.82

ICD-9: 595.82
Short Description: Irradiation cystitis
Long Description: Irradiation cystitis
This is the 2014 version of the ICD-9-CM diagnosis code 595.82

Code Classification
  • Diseases of the genitourinary system
    • Other diseases of urinary system (590-599)
      • 595 Cystitis

Information for Patients

Bladder Diseases

The bladder is a hollow organ in your lower abdomen that stores urine. Many conditions can affect your bladder. Some common ones are

  • Cystitis - inflammation of the bladder, often from an infection
  • Urinary incontinence - loss of bladder control
  • Overactive bladder - a condition in which the bladder squeezes urine out at the wrong time
  • Interstitial cystitis - a chronic problem that causes bladder pain and frequent, urgent urination
  • Bladder cancer

Doctors diagnose bladder diseases using different tests. These include urine tests, x-rays, and an examination of the bladder wall with a scope called a cystoscope. Treatment depends on the cause of the problem. It may include medicines and, in severe cases, surgery.

NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

  • Bladder biopsy
  • Bladder outlet obstruction
  • Bladder stones
  • Cystitis - noninfectious
  • Cystometric study
  • Indwelling catheter care
  • Kegel exercises - self-care
  • Neurogenic bladder
  • Radionuclide cystogram
  • Retrograde cystography
  • Self catheterization - female
  • Self catheterization - male
  • Suprapubic catheter care
  • Traumatic injury of the bladder and urethra
  • Urinary catheters
  • Urinary incontinence products - self-care
  • Urinary Retention - NIH (National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases)
  • Urine drainage bags
  • Urostomy - stoma and skin care
  • Voiding cystourethrogram

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Radiation Therapy

Also called: Brachytherapy, Radiotherapy

Radiation therapy is a cancer treatment. It uses high doses of radiation to kill cancer cells and stop them from spreading. About half of all cancer patients receive it. The radiation may be external, from special machines, or internal, from radioactive substances that a doctor places inside your body. The type of radiation therapy you receive depends on many factors, including

  • The type of cancer
  • The size of the cancer
  • The cancer's location in the body
  • How close the cancer is to normal tissues that are sensitive to radiation
  • How far into the body the radiation needs to travel
  • Your general health and medical history
  • Whether you will have other types of cancer treatment
  • Other factors, such as your age and other medical conditions

Radiation therapy can damage normal cells as well as cancer cells. Treatment must be carefully planned to minimize side effects. Common side effects include skin changes and fatigue. Other side effects depend on the part of your body being treated.

Sometimes radiation is used with other treatments, like surgery or chemotherapy.

NIH: National Cancer Institute

  • Abdominal radiation - discharge
  • Brain radiation - discharge
  • Breast radiation - discharge
  • Chest radiation - discharge
  • Head and Neck Radiation Treatment and Your Mouth - NIH (National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research)
  • Managing Radiation Therapy Side Effects: What to Do about Changes When You Urinate - NIH - Easy-to-Read (National Cancer Institute)
  • Managing Radiation Therapy Side Effects: What to Do about Feeling Sick to Your Stomach and Throwing Up (Nausea and Vomiting) - NIH - Easy-to-Read (National Cancer Institute)
  • Managing Radiation Therapy Side Effects: What to Do When You Have Loose Stools (Diarrhea) - NIH - Easy-to-Read (National Cancer Institute)
  • Mouth and neck radiation - discharge
  • Oral mucositis
  • Pelvic (between the hips) radiation - discharge
  • Proton therapy
  • Radiation enteritis
  • Radiation therapy
  • Radiation therapy -- skin care
  • Stereotactic radiosurgery
  • Stereotactic radiosurgery - discharge
  • Stereotactic Radiosurgery - Gamma Knife
  • What to Know about Brachytherapy (A Type of Internal Radiation Therapy) - NIH - Easy-to-Read (National Cancer Institute)
  • What to Know about External Beam Radiation Therapy - NIH - Easy-to-Read (National Cancer Institute)

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