ICD-9 Diagnosis Code 556.0

Ulcerative enterocolitis

Diagnosis Code 556.0

ICD-9: 556.0
Short Description: Ulcerative enterocolitis
Long Description: Ulcerative (chronic) enterocolitis
This is the 2014 version of the ICD-9-CM diagnosis code 556.0

Code Classification
  • Diseases of the digestive system
    • Noninfective enteritis and colitis (555-558)
      • 556 Ulcerative colitis

Information for Medical Professionals

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Index of Diseases and Injuries
References found for the code 556.0 in the Index of Diseases and Injuries:

Information for Patients

Crohn's Disease

Also called: Regional enteritis, Regional ileitis

Crohn's disease causes inflammation of the digestive system. It is one of a group of diseases called inflammatory bowel disease. Crohn's can affect any area from the mouth to the anus. It often affects the lower part of the small intestine called the ileum.

The cause of Crohn's disease is unknown. It may be due to an abnormal reaction by the body's immune system. It also seems to run in some families. It most commonly starts between the ages of 13 and 30.

The most common symptoms are pain in the abdomen and diarrhea. Other symptoms include

  • Bleeding from the rectum
  • Weight loss
  • Fever

Your doctor will diagnose Crohn's disease with a physical exam, lab tests, imaging tests, and a colonoscopy.

Crohn's can cause complications, such as intestinal blockages, ulcers in the intestine, and problems getting enough nutrients. People with Crohn's can also have joint pain and skin problems. Children with the disease may have growth problems.

There is no cure for Crohn's. Treatment can help control symptoms, and may include medicines, nutrition supplements, and/or surgery. Some people have long periods of remission, when they are free of symptoms.

NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

  • Colonoscopy
  • Crohn's disease
  • Crohn's disease - discharge
  • Facts about Crohn's Disease (Food and Drug Administration)
  • Low-residue fiber diet
  • Lower GI Series - NIH (National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases)
  • Total colectomy or proctocolectomy - discharge
  • Total proctocolectomy with ileostomy
  • Toxic megacolon
  • Virtual colonoscopy

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