ICD-9 Diagnosis Code 533.21

Ac pept ulc hem/perf-obs

Diagnosis Code 533.21

ICD-9: 533.21
Short Description: Ac pept ulc hem/perf-obs
Long Description: Acute peptic ulcer of unspecified site with hemorrhage and perforation, with obstruction
This is the 2014 version of the ICD-9-CM diagnosis code 533.21

Code Classification
  • Diseases of the digestive system
    • Diseases of esophagus, stomach, and duodenum (530-539)
      • 533 Peptic ulcer, site unspecified

Information for Patients

Gastrointestinal Bleeding

Also called: GI bleeding

Your digestive or gastrointestinal (GI) tract includes the esophagus, stomach, small intestine, large intestine or colon, rectum, and anus. Bleeding can come from any of these areas. The amount of bleeding can be so small that only a lab test can find it.

Signs of bleeding in the digestive tract depend where it is and how much bleeding there is.

Signs of bleeding in the upper digestive tract include

  • Bright red blood in vomit
  • Vomit that looks like coffee grounds
  • Black or tarry stool
  • Dark blood mixed with stool

Signs of bleeding in the lower digestive tract include

  • Black or tarry stool
  • Dark blood mixed with stool
  • Stool mixed or coated with bright red blood

GI bleeding is not a disease, but a symptom of a disease. There are many possible causes of GI bleeding, including hemorrhoids, peptic ulcers, tears or inflammation in the esophagus, diverticulosis and diverticulitis, ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, colonic polyps, or cancer in the colon, stomach or esophagus.

The test used most often to look for the cause of GI bleeding is called endoscopy. It uses a flexible instrument inserted through the mouth or rectum to view the inside of the GI tract. A type of endoscopy called colonoscopy looks at the large intestine.

NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

  • Bleeding esophageal varices
  • Bloody or tarry stools
  • Gastrointestinal bleeding
  • Lower GI Series - NIH (National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases)
  • Mallory-Weiss tear
  • Mesenteric angiography
  • RBC nuclear scan
  • Stool guaiac test
  • Vomiting blood

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Peptic Ulcer

Also called: Duodenal ulcer, Gastric ulcer, Stomach ulcer, Ulcer

A peptic ulcer is a sore in the lining of your stomach or your duodenum, the first part of your small intestine. A burning stomach pain is the most common symptom. The pain

  • Starts between meals or during the night
  • Briefly stops if you eat or take antacids
  • Lasts for minutes to hours
  • Comes and goes for several days or weeks

Peptic ulcers happen when the acids that help you digest food damage the walls of the stomach or duodenum. The most common cause is infection with a bacterium called Helicobacter pylori. Another cause is the long-term use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medicines (NSAIDs) such as aspirin and ibuprofen. Stress and spicy foods do not cause ulcers, but can make them worse.

To see if you have an H. pylori infection, your doctor will test your blood, breath, or stool. Your doctor also may look inside your stomach and duodenum by doing an endoscopy or x-ray.

Peptic ulcers will get worse if not treated. Treatment may include medicines to reduce stomach acids or antibiotics to kill H. pylori. Antacids and milk can't heal peptic ulcers. Not smoking and avoiding alcohol can help. You may need surgery if your ulcers don't heal.

NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

  • Culture - duodenal tissue
  • Peptic ulcer
  • Stomach acid test
  • Tests for H. pylori
  • Zollinger-Ellison syndrome

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