ICD-9 Diagnosis Code 528.01

Mucosits d/t antineo rx

Diagnosis Code 528.01

ICD-9: 528.01
Short Description: Mucosits d/t antineo rx
Long Description: Mucositis (ulcerative) due to antineoplastic therapy
This is the 2014 version of the ICD-9-CM diagnosis code 528.01

Code Classification
  • Diseases of the digestive system (520–579)
    • Diseases of oral cavity, salivary glands, and jaws (520-529)
      • 528 Diseases of the oral soft tissues, excluding lesions specific for gingiva and tongue

Information for Patients


Cancer Chemotherapy

Normally, your cells grow and die in a controlled way. Cancer cells keep forming without control. Chemotherapy is drug therapy that can kill these cells or stop them from multiplying. However, it can also harm healthy cells, which causes side effects.

During chemotherapy you may have no side effects or just a few. The kinds of side effects you have depend on the type and dose of chemotherapy you get. Side effects vary, but common ones are nausea, vomiting, tiredness, pain and hair loss. Healthy cells usually recover after chemotherapy, so most side effects gradually go away.

Your course of therapy will depend on the cancer type, the chemotherapy drugs used, the treatment goal and how your body responds. You may get treatment every day, every week or every month. You may have breaks between treatments so that your body has a chance to build new healthy cells. You might take the drugs by mouth, in a shot or intravenously.

NIH: National Cancer Institute

  • After chemotherapy - discharge
  • Central venous catheter - dressing change
  • Central venous catheter - flushing
  • Central venous catheters - ports
  • Chemotherapy and Your Mouth - NIH (National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research)
  • Low white blood cell count and cancer
  • Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Anemia - NIH - Easy-to-Read (National Cancer Institute)
  • Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Appetite Changes - NIH - Easy-to-Read (National Cancer Institute)
  • Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Bleeding Problems - NIH - Easy-to-Read (National Cancer Institute)
  • Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Constipation - NIH - Easy-to-Read (National Cancer Institute)
  • Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Diarrhea - NIH - Easy-to-Read (National Cancer Institute)
  • Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Fatigue (Feeling Weak and Very Tired) - NIH - Easy-to-Read (National Cancer Institute)
  • Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Hair Loss (Alopecia) - NIH - Easy-to-Read (National Cancer Institute)
  • Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Infection - NIH - Easy-to-Read (National Cancer Institute)
  • Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Memory Changes - NIH - Easy-to-Read (National Cancer Institute)
  • Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Mouth and Throat Changes - NIH - Easy-to-Read (National Cancer Institute)
  • Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Nausea and Vomiting - NIH - Easy-to-Read (National Cancer Institute)
  • Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Nerve Changes - NIH - Easy-to-Read (National Cancer Institute)
  • Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Pain - NIH - Easy-to-Read (National Cancer Institute)
  • Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Sexual and Fertility Changes in Men - NIH - Easy-to-Read (National Cancer Institute)
  • Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Sexual and Fertility Changes in Women - NIH - Easy-to-Read (National Cancer Institute)
  • Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Skin and Nail Changes - NIH - Easy-to-Read (National Cancer Institute)
  • Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Swelling (Fluid Retention) - NIH - Easy-to-Read (National Cancer Institute)
  • Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Urination Changes - NIH - Easy-to-Read (National Cancer Institute)
  • Oral mucositis
  • Peripherally inserted central catheter
  • Understanding Chemotherapy - NIH - Easy-to-Read (National Cancer Institute)


[Read More]

Mouth Disorders

Your mouth is one of the most important parts of your body. Any problem that affects your mouth can make it hard to eat, drink or even smile.

Some common mouth problems include

  • Cold sores - painful sores on the lips and around the mouth, caused by a virus
  • Canker sores - painful sores in the mouth, caused by bacteria or viruses
  • Thrush - a yeast infection that causes white patches in your mouth
  • Leukoplakia - white patches of excess cell growth on the cheeks, gums or tongue, common in smokers
  • Dry mouth - a lack of enough saliva, caused by some medicines and certain diseases
  • Gum or tooth problems
  • Bad breath

Treatment for mouth disorders varies, depending on the problem. Keeping a clean mouth by brushing and flossing often is important.

  • Burning Mouth Syndrome - NIH (National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research)
  • Drooling
  • Gum biopsy
  • Herpangina
  • Leukoplakia
  • Lichen planus
  • Mouth sores
  • Mouth ulcers
  • Mucous cyst
  • Oral mucositis
  • Palatal myoclonus
  • Perioral dermatitis
  • Thrush


[Read More]
Previous Code
Previous Code 528.00
Next Code
528.02 Next Code