ICD-9 Diagnosis Code 443.1

Thromboangiit obliterans

Diagnosis Code 443.1

ICD-9: 443.1
Short Description: Thromboangiit obliterans
Long Description: Thromboangiitis obliterans [Buerger's disease]
This is the 2014 version of the ICD-9-CM diagnosis code 443.1

Code Classification
  • Diseases of the circulatory system
    • Diseases of arteries, arterioles, and capillaries (440-449)
      • 443 Other peripheral vascular disease

Information for Medical Professionals

Convert to ICD-10 Additional informationCallout TooltipGeneral Equivalence Map
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.
  • I73.1 - Thromboangiitis obliterans [Buerger's disease]

Index of Diseases and Injuries
References found for the code 443.1 in the Index of Diseases and Injuries:

Information for Patients

Peripheral Arterial Disease

Also called: PAD

Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) happens when there is a narrowing of the blood vessels outside of your heart. The cause of PAD is atherosclerosis. This happens when plaque builds up on the walls of the arteries that supply blood to the arms and legs. Plaque is a substance made up of fat and cholesterol. It causes the arteries to narrow or become blocked. This can reduce or stop blood flow, usually to the legs. If severe enough, blocked blood flow can cause tissue death and can sometimes lead to amputation of the foot or leg.

The main risk factor for PAD is smoking. Other risk factors include older age and diseases like diabetes, high blood cholesterol, high blood pressure, heart disease, and stroke.

Many people who have PAD don't have any symptoms. If you have symptoms, they may include

  • Pain, numbness, achiness, or heaviness in the leg muscles. This happens when walking or climbing stairs.
  • Weak or absent pulses in the legs or feet
  • Sores or wounds on the toes, feet, or legs that heal slowly, poorly, or not at all
  • A pale or bluish color to the skin
  • A lower temperature in one leg than the other leg
  • Poor nail growth on the toes and decreased hair growth on the legs
  • Erectile dysfunction, especially among men who have diabetes

PAD can increase your risk of heart attack, stroke, and transient ischemic attack.

Doctors diagnose PAD with a physical exam and heart and imaging tests. Treatments include lifestyle changes, medicines, and sometimes surgery. Lifestyle changes include dietary changes, exercise, and efforts to lower high cholesterol levels and high blood pressure.

NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

  • Angioplasty and stent placement - peripheral arteries
  • Angioplasty and stent placement - peripheral arteries - discharge
  • Arteriogram
  • Doppler ultrasound exam of an arm or leg
  • Duplex ultrasound
  • Extremity angiography
  • Ischemic ulcers -- self-care
  • Magnetic resonance angiography
  • Peripheral artery bypass - leg
  • Peripheral artery bypass - leg - discharge
  • Peripheral artery disease - legs
  • Peripheral artery disease of the legs - self-care
  • Thromboangiitis obliterans

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