ICD-9 Diagnosis Code 404.93

Hyp ht/kd NOS st V w hf

Diagnosis Code 404.93

ICD-9: 404.93
Short Description: Hyp ht/kd NOS st V w hf
Long Description: Hypertensive heart and chronic kidney disease, unspecified, with heart failure and chronic kidney disease stage V or end stage renal disease
This is the 2014 version of the ICD-9-CM diagnosis code 404.93

Code Classification
  • Diseases of the circulatory system
    • Hypertensive disease (401-405)
      • 404 Hypertensive heart and renal disease

Information for Medical Professionals

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Index of Diseases and Injuries
References found for the code 404.93 in the Index of Diseases and Injuries:

Information for Patients

Heart Failure

Also called: CHF, Cardiac failure, Congestive heart failure, Left-sided heart failure, Right-sided heart failure

Heart failure is a condition in which the heart can't pump enough blood to meet the body's needs. Heart failure does not mean that your heart has stopped or is about to stop working. It means that your heart is not able to pump blood the way it should. It can affect one or both sides of the heart.

The weakening of the heart's pumping ability causes

  • Blood and fluid to back up into the lungs
  • The buildup of fluid in the feet, ankles and legs - called edema
  • Tiredness and shortness of breath

Common causes of heart failure are coronary artery disease, high blood pressure and diabetes. It is more common in people who are 65 years old or older, African Americans, people who are overweight, and people who have had a heart attack. Men have a higher rate of heart failure than women.

Your doctor will diagnose heart failure by doing a physical exam and heart tests. Treatment includes treating the underlying cause of your heart failure, medicines, and heart transplantation if other treatments fail.

NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

  • Abdominal tap
  • Brain natriutetic peptide test
  • Cardiac catheterization
  • Cardiac catheterization - discharge
  • Electrocardiogram
  • Exercise stress test
  • Heart failure - discharge
  • Heart failure - fluids and diuretics
  • Heart failure - home monitoring
  • Heart failure - medicines
  • Heart failure - palliative care
  • Heart failure - surgeries and devices
  • Heart failure - tests
  • Heart failure overview
  • Hypertensive heart disease
  • Pleural effusion
  • Pulmonary edema
  • Using oxygen at home
  • Ventricular assist device

[Read More]

High Blood Pressure

Also called: Benign essential hypertension, Essential hypertension, HBP, HTN, Hypertension

Blood pressure is the force of your blood pushing against the walls of your arteries. Each time your heart beats, it pumps blood into the arteries. Your blood pressure is highest when your heart beats, pumping the blood. This is called systolic pressure. When your heart is at rest, between beats, your blood pressure falls. This is called diastolic pressure.

Your blood pressure reading uses these two numbers. Usually the systolic number comes before or above the diastolic number. A reading of

  • 119/79 or lower is normal blood pressure
  • 140/90 or higher is high blood pressure
  • Between 120 and 139 for the top number, or between 80 and 89 for the bottom number is called prehypertension. Prehypertension means you may end up with high blood pressure, unless you take steps to prevent it.

High blood pressure usually has no symptoms, but it can cause serious problems such as stroke, heart failure, heart attack and kidney failure.

You can control high blood pressure through healthy lifestyle habits such as exercise and the DASH diet and taking medicines, if needed.

NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

  • ACE inhibitors
  • Blood pressure measurement
  • Blood pressure monitors for home
  • Controlling your high blood pressure
  • Drug-induced hypertension
  • High blood pressure
  • High blood pressure and eye disease
  • High blood pressure medications
  • Hypertensive heart disease
  • Low-salt diet
  • Malignant hypertension
  • Renovascular hypertension
  • Talk with Your Health Care Provider about High Blood Pressure (Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality)

[Read More]

Kidney Failure

Also called: ESRD, End-stage renal disease, Renal failure

Healthy kidneys clean your blood by removing excess fluid, minerals, and wastes. They also make hormones that keep your bones strong and your blood healthy. But if the kidneys are damaged, they don't work properly. Harmful wastes can build up in your body. Your blood pressure may rise. Your body may retain excess fluid and not make enough red blood cells. This is called kidney failure.

If your kidneys fail, you need treatment to replace the work they normally do. The treatment options are dialysis or a kidney transplant. Each treatment has benefits and drawbacks. No matter which treatment you choose, you'll need to make some changes in your life, including how you eat and plan your activities. But with the help of healthcare providers, family, and friends, most people with kidney failure can lead full and active lives.

NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

  • Acute kidney failure
  • Acute tubular necrosis
  • Chronic Kidney Disease-Mineral and Bone Disorder - NIH (National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases)
  • Chronic renal failure
  • Dialysis
  • End-stage kidney disease
  • Glomerular filtration rate
  • Potter syndrome
  • Prerenal azotemia
  • Renal arteriography
  • Renal scan

[Read More]
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