ICD-9 Diagnosis Code 338.18

Acute postop pain NEC

Diagnosis Code 338.18

ICD-9: 338.18
Short Description: Acute postop pain NEC
Long Description: Other acute postoperative pain
This is the 2014 version of the ICD-9-CM diagnosis code 338.18

Code Classification
  • Diseases of the nervous system
    • Pain (338)
      • 338 Pain, not elsewhere classified

Information for Medical Professionals

Convert to ICD-10 Additional informationCallout TooltipGeneral Equivalence Map
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.
  • G89.18 - Other acute postprocedural pain

  • Acute postoperative pain
  • Internal mammary artery syndrome
  • Limb stump pain
  • Persistent pain following procedure
  • Post-abdominoperineal resection pain
  • Postcordotomy pain
  • Post-episiotomy pain
  • Post-herniorraphy pain
  • Post-mastectomy pain
  • Postoperative pain
  • Postpartum episiotomy pain
  • Postprocedural finding of tenderness
  • Post-surgery back pain
  • Post-vasectomy pain

Index of Diseases and Injuries
References found for the code 338.18 in the Index of Diseases and Injuries:

Information for Patients

After Surgery

Also called: Postoperative care, Recovery from surgery

After any operation, you'll have some side effects. There is usually some pain with surgery. There may also be swelling and soreness around the area that the surgeon cut. Your surgeon can tell you which side effects to expect.

There can also be complications. These are unplanned events linked to the operation. Some complications are infection, too much bleeding, reaction to anesthesia, or accidental injury. Some people have a greater risk of complications because of other medical conditions.

Your surgeon can tell you how you might feel and what you will be able to do - or not do - the first few days, weeks, or months after surgery. Some other questions to ask are

  • How long you will be in the hospital
  • What kind of supplies, equipment, and help you might need when you go home
  • When you can go back to work
  • When it is ok to start exercising again
  • Are they any other restrictions in your activities

Following your surgeon's advice can help you recover as soon as possible.

Agency for Healthcare Quality and Research

  • Bland diet
  • Deep breathing after surgery
  • Diet - clear liquid
  • Diet - full liquid
  • Getting your home ready - after the hospital
  • Hemorrhoid removal -- discharge
  • Indwelling catheter care
  • Post surgical pain treatment - adults
  • Preparing for surgery when you have diabetes
  • Self catheterization - female
  • Self catheterization - male
  • Sternal exploration or closure
  • Suprapubic catheter care
  • Surgical wound care -- closed
  • Surgical wound infection - treatment
  • The day of surgery for your child
  • The day of your surgery - adult
  • Tracheostomy tube - eating
  • Tracheostomy tube - speaking
  • Urinary catheters
  • Urine drainage bags
  • Using an incentive spirometer

[Read More]


Pain is a feeling triggered in the nervous system. Pain may be sharp or dull. It may come and go, or it may be constant. You may feel pain in one area of your body, such as your back, abdomen or chest or you may feel pain all over, such as when your muscles ache from the flu.

Pain can be helpful in diagnosing a problem. Without pain, you might seriously hurt yourself without knowing it, or you might not realize you have a medical problem that needs treatment. Once you take care of the problem, pain usually goes away. However, sometimes pain goes on for weeks, months or even years. This is called chronic pain. Sometimes chronic pain is due to an ongoing cause, such as cancer or arthritis. Sometimes the cause is unknown.

Fortunately, there are many ways to treat pain. Treatment varies depending on the cause of pain. Pain relievers, acupuncture and sometimes surgery are helpful.

  • Aches and pains during pregnancy
  • Neuralgia
  • Palliative care - managing pain
  • Somatoform pain disorder

[Read More]
Previous Code
Previous Code 338.12
Next Code
338.19 Next Code