ICD-9 Diagnosis Code 313.0

Overanxious disorder

Diagnosis Code 313.0

ICD-9: 313.0
Short Description: Overanxious disorder
Long Description: Overanxious disorder specific to childhood and adolescence
This is the 2014 version of the ICD-9-CM diagnosis code 313.0

Code Classification
  • Mental disorders
    • Neurotic disorders, personality disorders, and other nonpsychotic mental disorders (300-316)
      • 313 Disturbance of emotions specific to childhood and adolescence

Information for Medical Professionals

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Index of Diseases and Injuries
References found for the code 313.0 in the Index of Diseases and Injuries:

Information for Patients


Fear and anxiety are part of life. You may feel anxious before you take a test or walk down a dark street. This kind of anxiety is useful - it can make you more alert or careful. It usually ends soon after you are out of the situation that caused it. But for millions of people in the United States, the anxiety does not go away, and gets worse over time. They may have chest pains or nightmares. They may even be afraid to leave home. These people have anxiety disorders. Types include

  • Panic disorder
  • Obsessive-compulsive disorder
  • Post-traumatic stress disorder
  • Phobias
  • Generalized anxiety disorder

Treatment can involve medicines, therapy or both.

NIH: National Institute of Mental Health

  • Generalized anxiety disorder
  • Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD): When Worry Gets Out of Control - NIH - Easy-to-Read (National Institute of Mental Health)
  • Generalized anxiety disorder -- self-care
  • Palliative care - fear and anxiety
  • Separation anxiety
  • Stress and anxiety

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Child Mental Health

It's important to recognize and treat mental illnesses in children early on. Once mental illness develops, it becomes a regular part of your child's behavior and is more difficult to treat.

But it's not always easy to know when your child has a serious problem. Everyday stresses can cause changes in your child's behavior. For example, getting a new brother or sister or going to a new school may cause a child to temporarily act out. Warning signs that it might be a more serious problem include

  • Problems in more than one setting (at school, at home, with peers)
  • Changes in appetite or sleep
  • Social withdrawal or fear of things he or she did not used to be not afraid of
  • Returning to behaviors more common in younger children, such as bedwetting
  • Signs of being upset, such as sadness or tearfulness
  • Signs of self-destructive behavior, such as head-banging or suddenly getting hurt often
  • Repeated thoughts of death

To diagnose mental health problems, the doctor or mental health specialist looks at your child's signs and symptoms, medical history, and family history. Treatments include medicines and talk therapy.

NIH: National Institute of Mental Health

  • Reactive attachment disorder of infancy or early childhood
  • Stress in childhood
  • Traumatic events and children

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Teen Mental Health

Being a teenager is hard. You're under stress to be liked, do well in school, get along with your family, and make big decisions. You can't avoid most of these pressures, and worrying about them is normal. But feeling very sad, hopeless or worthless could be warning signs of a mental health problem.

Mental health problems are real, painful, and sometimes severe. You might need help if you have the signs mentioned above, or if you

  • Often feel very angry or very worried
  • Feel grief for a long time after a loss or death
  • Think your mind is controlled or out of control
  • Use alcohol or drugs
  • Exercise, diet and/or binge-eat obsessively
  • Hurt other people or destroy property
  • Do reckless things that could harm you or others

Mental health problems can be treated. To find help, talk to your parents, school counselor, or health care provider.

  • Help your teen cope with stress
  • Helping your teen with depression
  • Managing your depression - teens
  • Recognizing teen depression

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