ICD-9 Diagnosis Code 286.59

Ot hem d/t circ anticoag

Diagnosis Code 286.59

ICD-9: 286.59
Short Description: Ot hem d/t circ anticoag
Long Description: Other hemorrhagic disorder due to intrinsic circulating anticoagulants, antibodies, or inhibitors
This is the 2014 version of the ICD-9-CM diagnosis code 286.59

Code Classification
  • Diseases of the blood and blood-forming organs
    • Diseases of the blood and blood-forming organs (280-289)
      • 286 Coagulation defects

Information for Medical Professionals

Convert to ICD-10 Additional informationCallout TooltipGeneral Equivalence Map
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.
  • D68.318 - Oth hemorrhagic disord d/t intrns circ anticoag,antib,inhib

Index of Diseases and Injuries
References found for the code 286.59 in the Index of Diseases and Injuries:

Information for Patients


Also called: Hematoma, Hemorrhage

Bleeding is the loss of blood. It can happen inside or outside the body. Bleeding can be a reaction to a cut or other wound. It can also result from an injury to internal organs.

There are many situations in which you might bleed. A bruise is bleeding under the skin. Some strokes are caused by bleeding in the brain. Other bleeding, such as gastrointestinal bleeding, coughing up blood, or vaginal bleeding, can be a symptom of a disease.

Normally, when you bleed, your blood forms clots to stop the bleeding. Severe bleeding may require first aid or a trip to the emergency room. If you have a bleeding disorder, your blood does not form clots normally.

  • Bleeding
  • Bleeding gums
  • Bleeding into the skin
  • Intraventricular hemorrhage of the newborn
  • Splinter hemorrhages
  • Subarachnoid hemorrhage
  • Subconjunctival hemorrhage

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Bleeding Disorders

Also called: Clotting disorders

Normally, if you get hurt, your body forms a blood clot to stop the bleeding. For blood to clot, your body needs cells called platelets and proteins known as clotting factors. If you have a bleeding disorder, you either do not have enough platelets or clotting factors or they don't work the way they should.

Bleeding disorders can be the result of other diseases, such as severe liver disease. They can also be inherited. Hemophilia is an inherited bleeding disorder. Bleeding disorders can also be a side effect of medicines.

  • Bleeding disorders
  • Bleeding time
  • Congenital afibrinogenemia
  • Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC)
  • Factor II deficiency
  • Factor V deficiency
  • Factor VII deficiency
  • Factor X deficiency
  • Factor XII (Hageman factor) deficiency
  • Fibrin degradation products
  • Fibrinogen
  • Fibrinopeptide A blood test
  • Hemorrhagic disease of the newborn
  • Osler-Weber-Rendu syndrome
  • Partial thromboplastin time (PTT)
  • Prothrombin time (PT)

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