ICD-9 Diagnosis Code 283.11

Hemolytic uremic synd

Diagnosis Code 283.11

ICD-9: 283.11
Short Description: Hemolytic uremic synd
Long Description: Hemolytic-uremic syndrome
This is the 2014 version of the ICD-9-CM diagnosis code 283.11

Code Classification
  • Diseases of the blood and blood-forming organs
    • Diseases of the blood and blood-forming organs (280-289)
      • 283 Acquired hemolytic anemias

Information for Patients


Also called: Iron poor blood

If you have anemia, your blood does not carry enough oxygen to the rest of your body. The most common cause of anemia is not having enough iron. Your body needs iron to make hemoglobin. Hemoglobin is an iron-rich protein that gives the red color to blood. It carries oxygen from the lungs to the rest of the body.

Anemia has three main causes: blood loss, lack of red blood cell production, and high rates of red blood cell destruction.

Conditions that may lead to anemia include

  • Heavy periods
  • Pregnancy
  • Ulcers
  • Colon polyps or colon cancer
  • Inherited disorders
  • A diet that does not have enough iron, folic acid or vitamin B12
  • Blood disorders such as sickle cell anemia and thalassemia, or cancer
  • Aplastic anemia, a condition that can be inherited or acquired
  • G6PD deficiency, a metabolic disorder

Anemia can make you feel tired, cold, dizzy, and irritable. You may be short of breath or have a headache.

Your doctor will diagnose anemia with a physical exam and blood tests. Treatment depends on the kind of anemia you have.

NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

  • Anemia
  • Anemia - B12 deficiency
  • Anemia caused by low iron -- infants and toddlers
  • Anemia of chronic disease
  • Anemia of Inflammation and Chronic Disease - NIH
  • Antiparietal cell antibody test
  • Congenital spherocytic anemia
  • Ferritin blood test
  • Folate-deficiency anemia
  • Hemoglobin electrophoresis
  • Hemolytic anemia
  • Hemolytic anemia caused by chemicals and toxins
  • Immune hemolytic anemia
  • Iron deficiency anemia
  • Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Anemia - NIH - Easy-to-Read (National Cancer Institute)
  • Pernicious anemia
  • Serum free hemoglobin test
  • Serum iron test
  • Total iron binding capacity
  • Vitamin B12 level

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E. Coli Infections

Also called: Escherichia coli

E. coli is the name of a type of bacteria that lives in your intestines. Most types of E. coli are harmless. However, some types can make you sick and cause diarrhea. One type causes travelers' diarrhea. The worst type of E. coli causes bloody diarrhea, and can sometimes cause kidney failure and even death. These problems are most likely to occur in children and in adults with weak immune systems.

You can get E. coli infections by eating foods containing the bacteria. Symptoms of infection include

  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Severe abdominal cramps
  • Watery or very bloody diarrhea
  • Fatigue
  • Fever

To help avoid food poisoning and prevent infection, handle food safely. Cook meat well, wash fruits and vegetables before eating or cooking them, and avoid unpasteurized milk and juices. You can also get the infection by swallowing water in a swimming pool contaminated with human waste.

Most cases of E. coli infection get better without treatment in 5 to 10 days.

NIH: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

  • E. coli enteritis
  • Hemolytic-uremic syndrome

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Urinary Tract Infections

Also called: UTI

The urinary system is the body's drainage system for removing wastes and extra water. It includes two kidneys, two ureters, a bladder, and a urethra. Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are the second most common type of infection in the body.

You may have a UTI if you notice

  • Pain or burning when you urinate
  • Fever, tiredness or shakiness
  • An urge to urinate often
  • Pressure in your lower belly
  • Urine that smells bad or looks cloudy or reddish
  • Pain in your back or side below the ribs

People of any age or sex can get UTIs. But about four times as many women get UTIs as men. You're also at higher risk if you have diabetes, need a tube to drain your bladder, or have a spinal cord injury.

If you think you have a UTI it is important to see your doctor. Your doctor can tell if you have a UTI with a urine test. Treatment is with antibiotics.

NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

  • Asymptomatic bacteriuria
  • Catheter-associated UTI
  • Cystitis - acute bacterial
  • Leukocyte esterase
  • Radionuclide cystogram
  • Retrograde cystography
  • Ureteroscopy
  • Urinary tract infection - adults
  • Urinary tract infection - children
  • Urinary tract infection in children - aftercare
  • Urine culture
  • Voiding cystourethrogram

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