ICD-9 Diagnosis Code 249.61

Sec DM neuro uncontrld

Diagnosis Code 249.61

ICD-9: 249.61
Short Description: Sec DM neuro uncontrld
Long Description: Secondary diabetes mellitus with neurological manifestations, uncontrolled
This is the 2014 version of the ICD-9-CM diagnosis code 249.61

Code Classification
  • Endocrine, nutritional and metabolic diseases, and immunity disorders
    • Diseases of other endocrine glands (249-259)
      • 249 Secondary diabetes mellitus

Information for Patients


Also called: DM, Diabetes mellitus

Diabetes is a disease in which your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. Glucose comes from the foods you eat. Insulin is a hormone that helps the glucose get into your cells to give them energy. With type 1 diabetes, your body does not make insulin. With type 2 diabetes, the more common type, your body does not make or use insulin well. Without enough insulin, the glucose stays in your blood. You can also have prediabetes. This means that your blood sugar is higher than normal but not high enough to be called diabetes. Having prediabetes puts you at a higher risk of getting type 2 diabetes.

Over time, having too much glucose in your blood can cause serious problems. It can damage your eyes, kidneys, and nerves. Diabetes can also cause heart disease, stroke and even the need to remove a limb. Pregnant women can also get diabetes, called gestational diabetes.

A blood test can show if you have diabetes. Exercise, weight control and sticking to your meal plan can help control your diabetes. You should also monitor your glucose level and take medicine if prescribed.

NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

  • A1C test
  • Blood sugar test - blood
  • Choose More than 50 Ways to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes - NIH - Easy-to-Read (National Diabetes Education Program)
  • Diabetes
  • Diabetes - keeping active
  • Diabetes - low blood sugar - self-care
  • Diabetes - tests and checkups
  • Diabetes - when you are sick
  • Diabetes and exercise
  • Giving an insulin injection
  • Glucose tolerance test - non-pregnant
  • High blood sugar
  • Immunizations - diabetes
  • Long term complications of diabetes
  • Preparing for surgery when you have diabetes

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Diabetic Nerve Problems

Also called: Diabetic neuropathy

If you have diabetes, your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. Over time, this can damage the covering on your nerves or the blood vessels that bring oxygen to your nerves. Damaged nerves may stop sending messages, or may send messages slowly or at the wrong times.

This damage is called diabetic neuropathy. Over half of people with diabetes get it. Symptoms may include

  • Numbness in your hands, legs, or feet
  • Shooting pains, burning, or tingling
  • Nausea, vomiting, constipation, or diarrhea
  • Problems with sexual function
  • Urinary problems
  • Dizziness when you change positions quickly

Your doctor will diagnose diabetic neuropathy with a physical exam and nerve tests. Controlling your blood sugar can help prevent nerve problems, or keep them from getting worse. Treatment may include pain relief and other medicines.

NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

  • Cranial mononeuropathy III - diabetic type
  • Diabetes and nerve damage
  • Nerve damage from diabetes - self-care

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