ICD-9 Diagnosis Code 101

Vincent's angina

Diagnosis Code 101

ICD-9: 101
Short Description: Vincent's angina
Long Description: Vincent's angina
This is the 2014 version of the ICD-9-CM diagnosis code 101

Code Classification
  • Infectious and parasitic diseases
    • Other spirochetal diseases (100-104)
      • 101 Vincent's angina

Information for Medical Professionals

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Index of Diseases and Injuries
References found for the code 101 in the Index of Diseases and Injuries:

Information for Patients

Bacterial Infections

Bacteria are living things that have only one cell. Under a microscope, they look like balls, rods, or spirals. They are so small that a line of 1,000 could fit across a pencil eraser. Most bacteria won't hurt you - less than 1 percent of the different types make people sick. Many are helpful. Some bacteria help to digest food, destroy disease-causing cells, and give the body needed vitamins. Bacteria are also used in making healthy foods like yogurt and cheese.

But infectious bacteria can make you ill. They reproduce quickly in your body. Many give off chemicals called toxins, which can damage tissue and make you sick. Examples of bacteria that cause infections include Streptococcus, Staphylococcus, and E. coli.

Antibiotics are the usual treatment. When you take antibiotics, follow the directions carefully. Each time you take antibiotics, you increase the chances that bacteria in your body will learn to resist them causing antibiotic resistance. Later, you could get or spread an infection that those antibiotics cannot cure.

NIH: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

  • Actinomycosis
  • Bacterial vaginosis -- aftercare
  • Blood culture
  • Gram stain
  • Gram stain of skin lesion
  • Necrotizing soft tissue infection
  • Q fever
  • Serology for tularemia
  • Shigellosis
  • Stool Gram stain
  • Tularemia

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Pain is a feeling triggered in the nervous system. Pain may be sharp or dull. It may come and go, or it may be constant. You may feel pain in one area of your body, such as your back, abdomen or chest or you may feel pain all over, such as when your muscles ache from the flu.

Pain can be helpful in diagnosing a problem. Without pain, you might seriously hurt yourself without knowing it, or you might not realize you have a medical problem that needs treatment. Once you take care of the problem, pain usually goes away. However, sometimes pain goes on for weeks, months or even years. This is called chronic pain. Sometimes chronic pain is due to an ongoing cause, such as cancer or arthritis. Sometimes the cause is unknown.

Fortunately, there are many ways to treat pain. Treatment varies depending on the cause of pain. Pain relievers, acupuncture and sometimes surgery are helpful.

  • Aches and pains during pregnancy
  • Neuralgia
  • Palliative care - managing pain
  • Somatoform pain disorder

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Throat Disorders

Also called: Pharyngeal disorders

Your throat is a tube that carries food to your esophagus and air to your windpipe and larynx. The technical name for throat is pharynx.

Throat problems are common. You've probably had a sore throat. The cause is usually a viral infection, but other causes include allergies, infection with strep bacteria or the upward movement of stomach acids into the esophagus, called GERD.

Other problems that affect the throat include

  • Tonsillitis - an infection in the tonsils
  • Pharyngitis - inflammation of the pharynx
  • Cancers
  • Croup - inflammation, usually in small children, which causes a barking cough

Most throat problems are minor and go away on their own. Treatments, when needed, depend on the problem.

  • Acute upper airway obstruction
  • Epiglottitis
  • Glossopharyngeal neuralgia
  • Herpangina
  • Laryngitis
  • Laryngoscopy
  • Retropharyngeal abscess
  • Strep throat
  • Throat swab culture

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