ICD-9 Diagnosis Code 008.61

Intes infec rotavirus

Diagnosis Code 008.61

ICD-9: 008.61
Short Description: Intes infec rotavirus
Long Description: Enteritis due to rotavirus
This is the 2014 version of the ICD-9-CM diagnosis code 008.61

Code Classification
  • Infectious and parasitic diseases
    • Intestinal infectious diseases (001-009)
      • 008 Intestinal infections due to other organisms

Information for Medical Professionals

Convert to ICD-10 Additional informationCallout TooltipGeneral Equivalence Map
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.
  • A08.0 - Rotaviral enteritis

Index of Diseases and Injuries
References found for the code 008.61 in the Index of Diseases and Injuries:

    • Enteritis (acute) (catarrhal) (choleraic) (chronic) (congestive) (diarrheal) (exudative) (follicular) (hemorrhagic) (infantile) (lienteric) (noninfectious) (perforative) (phlegmonous) (presumed noninfectious) (pseudomembranous) 558.9
      • due to
        • Rotavirus 008.61

Information for Patients


Also called: Stomach flu

Have you ever had the "stomach flu?" What you probably had was gastroenteritis - not a type of flu at all. Gastroenteritis is an inflammation of the lining of the intestines caused by a virus, bacteria or parasites. Viral gastroenteritis is the second most common illness in the U.S. The cause is often a norovirus infection. It spreads through contaminated food or water, and contact with an infected person. The best prevention is frequent hand washing.

Symptoms of gastroenteritis include diarrhea, abdominal pain, vomiting, headache, fever and chills. Most people recover with no treatment.

The most common problem with gastroenteritis is dehydration. This happens if you do not drink enough fluids to replace what you lose through vomiting and diarrhea. Dehydration is most common in babies, young children, the elderly and people with weak immune systems.

NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

  • Bacterial gastroenteritis
  • Bland diet
  • CMV - gastroenteritis/colitis
  • Fecal culture
  • Rectal culture
  • Stool Gram stain
  • Viral gastroenteritis
  • When you have nausea and vomiting
  • When you or your child has diarrhea

[Read More]

Rotavirus Infections

Rotavirus is a virus that causes gastroenteritis. Symptoms include severe diarrhea, vomiting, fever, and dehydration. Almost all children in the U.S. are likely to be infected with rotavirus before their 5th birthday.

Infections happen most often in the winter and spring. It is very easy for children with the virus to spread it to other children and sometimes to adults. Once a child gets the virus, it takes about two days to become sick. Vomiting and diarrhea may last from three to eight days.

There is no medicine to treat it. To prevent dehydration, have your child drink plenty of liquids. Your health care provider may recommend oral rehydration drinks. Some children need to go to the hospital for IV fluids. Two vaccines against rotavirus infections are available.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

  • Rotavirus antigen test
  • Rotavirus Vaccine: What You Need to Know (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
  • Rotavirus: Information for Parents (American Academy of Pediatrics)
  • Rotavirus: Information for Parents (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
  • Rotavirus: Information for Parents (American Academy of Family Physicians)

[Read More]
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