ICD-9 Diagnosis Code 006.3

Amebic liver abscess

Diagnosis Code 006.3

ICD-9: 006.3
Short Description: Amebic liver abscess
Long Description: Amebic liver abscess
This is the 2014 version of the ICD-9-CM diagnosis code 006.3

Code Classification
  • Infectious and parasitic diseases
    • Intestinal infectious diseases (001-009)
      • 006 Amebiasis

Information for Medical Professionals

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The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.
  • A06.4 - Amebic liver abscess

Index of Diseases and Injuries
References found for the code 006.3 in the Index of Diseases and Injuries:

Information for Patients


An abscess is a pocket of pus. You can get an abscess almost anywhere in your body. When an area of your body becomes infected, your body's immune system tries to fight the infection. White blood cells go to the infected area, collect within the damaged tissue, and cause inflammation. During this process, pus forms. Pus is a mixture of living and dead white blood cells, germs, and dead tissue.

Bacteria, viruses, parasites and swallowed objects can all lead to abscesses. Skin abscesses are easy to detect. They are red, raised and painful. Abscesses inside your body may not be obvious and can damage organs, including the brain, lungs and others. Treatments include drainage and antibiotics.

  • Abscess
  • Abscess scan - radioactive
  • Amebic liver abscess
  • Anorectal abscess
  • Bartholin's abscess
  • Brain abscess
  • Epidural abscess
  • Intra-abdominal abscess
  • Pancreatic abscess
  • Perirenal abscess
  • Peritonsillar abscess
  • Pilonidal cyst resection
  • Pyogenic liver abscess
  • Retropharyngeal abscess
  • Skin abscess
  • Subareolar abscess
  • Tooth abscess

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Liver Diseases

Also called: Hepatic disease

Your liver is the largest organ inside your body. It helps your body digest food, store energy, and remove poisons.

There are many kinds of liver diseases. Viruses cause some of them, like hepatitis A, hepatitis B and hepatitis C. Others can be the result of drugs, poisons or drinking too much alcohol. If the liver forms scar tissue because of an illness, it's called cirrhosis. Jaundice, or yellowing of the skin, can be one sign of liver disease.

Cancer can affect the liver. You could also inherit a liver disease such as hemochromatosis.

  • 5'-nucleotidase
  • Abdominal tap
  • Albumin - serum
  • Alcoholic liver disease
  • ALP - blood test
  • ALP isoenzyme test
  • ALT
  • Amebic liver abscess
  • Ascites
  • AST
  • Bilirubin - urine
  • Diet - liver disease
  • Fatty liver -- nonalcoholic
  • Hepatic encephalopathy
  • Hepatic hemangioma
  • Hepatic ischemia
  • Hepatocerebral degeneration
  • Hepatomegaly
  • Liver disease
  • Liver scan
  • Portacaval shunting
  • Pyogenic liver abscess
  • Total protein
  • Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS)

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Parasitic Diseases

Parasites are living things that use other living things - like your body - for food and a place to live. You can get them from contaminated food or water, a bug bite, or sexual contact. Some parasitic diseases are easily treated and some are not.

Parasites range in size from tiny, one-celled organisms called protozoa to worms that can be seen with the naked eye. Some parasitic diseases occur in the United States. Contaminated water supplies can lead to Giardia infections. Cats can transmit toxoplasmosis, which is dangerous for pregnant women. Others, like malaria, are common in other parts of the world.

If you are traveling, it's important to drink only water you know is safe. Prevention is especially important. There are no vaccines for parasitic diseases. Some medicines are available to treat parasitic infections.

  • Amebiasis
  • Amebic liver abscess
  • Ascariasis
  • Creeping eruption
  • Rectal culture
  • Stool ova and parasites exam
  • Taeniasis
  • Visceral larva migrans

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