ICD-9 Diagnosis Code 005.0

Staph food poisoning

Diagnosis Code 005.0

ICD-9: 005.0
Short Description: Staph food poisoning
Long Description: Staphylococcal food poisoning
This is the 2014 version of the ICD-9-CM diagnosis code 005.0

Code Classification
  • Infectious and parasitic diseases
    • Intestinal infectious diseases (001-009)
      • 005 Other food poisoning (bacterial)

Information for Medical Professionals

Convert to ICD-10 Additional informationCallout TooltipGeneral Equivalence Map
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.
  • A05.0 - Foodborne staphylococcal intoxication

Index of Diseases and Injuries
References found for the code 005.0 in the Index of Diseases and Injuries:

Information for Patients

Foodborne Illness

Also called: Food Poisoning

Each year, 48 million people in the U.S. get sick from contaminated food. Common culprits include bacteria, parasites and viruses. Symptoms range from mild to serious. They include

  • Upset stomach
  • Abdominal cramps
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Fever
  • Dehydration

Harmful bacteria are the most common cause of foodborne illness. Foods may have some bacteria on them when you buy them. Raw meat may become contaminated during slaughter. Fruits and vegetables may become contaminated when they are growing or when they are processed. But it can also happen in your kitchen if you leave food out for more than 2 hours at room temperature. Handling food safely can help prevent foodborne illnesses.

The treatment in most cases is increasing your fluid intake. For more serious illness, you may need treatment at a hospital.

NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

  • Fecal culture
  • Food poisoning
  • Foodborne Illnesses: What You Need to Know (Food and Drug Administration)
  • Gastritis
  • Poisoning - fish and shellfish
  • Shigellosis
  • Stool Gram stain

[Read More]

Staphylococcal Infections

Also called: Staph

Staph is short for Staphylococcus, a type of bacteria. There are over 30 types, but Staphylococcus aureus causes most staph infections (pronounced "staff infections"), including

  • Skin infections
  • Pneumonia
  • Food poisoning
  • Toxic shock syndrome
  • Blood poisoning (bacteremia)

Skin infections are the most common. They can look like pimples or boils. They may be red, swollen and painful, and sometimes have pus or other drainage. They can turn into impetigo, which turns into a crust on the skin, or cellulitis, a swollen, red area of skin that feels hot.

Anyone can get a staph skin infection. You are more likely to get one if you have a cut or scratch, or have contact with a person or surface that has staph bacteria. The best way to prevent staph is to keep hands and wounds clean. Most staph skin infections are easily treated with antibiotics or by draining the infection. Some staph bacteria such as MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) are resistant to certain antibiotics, making infections harder to treat.

  • Boils
  • Carbuncle
  • Scalded skin syndrome
  • Staph infections -- self-care at home
  • Toxic shock syndrome
  • Tracheitis

[Read More]
Previous Code
Previous Code 004.9
Next Code
005.1 Next Code