ICD-10 Diagnosis Code Z90.09

Acquired absence of other part of head and neck

Diagnosis Code Z90.09

ICD-10: Z90.09
Short Description: Acquired absence of other part of head and neck
Long Description: Acquired absence of other part of head and neck
This is the 2017 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code Z90.09

Valid for Submission
The code Z90.09 is valid for submission for HIPAA-covered transactions.

Code Classification
  • Factors influencing health status and contact with health services (Z00–Z99)
    • Persons with potential health hazards related to family and personal history and certain conditions influencing health status (Z77-Z99)
      • Acquired absence of organs, not elsewhere classified (Z90)

Information for Medical Professionals


Code Edits
The following edits are applicable to this code:
Unacceptable principal diagnosis Additional informationCallout TooltipUnacceptable principal diagnosis
There are selected codes that describe a circumstance which influences an individual’s health status but not a current illness or injury, or codes that are not specific manifestations but may be due to an underlying cause. These codes are considered unacceptable as a principal diagnosis.


Convert to ICD-9 Additional informationCallout TooltipGeneral Equivalence Map
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

Present on Admission (POA) Additional informationCallout TooltipPresent on Admission
The Present on Admission (POA) indicator is used for diagnosis codes included in claims involving inpatient admissions to general acute care hospitals. POA indicators must be reported to CMS on each claim to facilitate the grouping of diagnoses codes into the proper Diagnostic Related Groups (DRG). CMS publishes a listing of specific diagnosis codes that are exempt from the POA reporting requirement.

The code Z90.09 is exempt from POA reporting.

Synonyms
  • Burn of chin
  • Burn of ear
  • Burn of face AND/OR head
  • Burn of scalp
  • Deep full thickness burn of chin, with loss of body part
  • Deep full thickness burn of ear, with loss of body part
  • Deep full thickness burn of multiple parts of the face, head or neck - with loss of body part
  • Deep full thickness burn of nose, with loss of body part
  • Deep full thickness burn of the cheek, with loss of body part
  • Deep full thickness burn of the face, head or neck, with loss of body part
  • Deep full thickness burn of the forehead, with loss of body part
  • Deep full thickness burn of the lip
  • Deep full thickness burn of the scalp, with loss of body part
  • Deep third degree burn of cheek
  • Deep third degree burn of cheek
  • Deep third degree burn of chin
  • Deep third degree burn of face AND/OR head
  • Deep third degree burn of face AND/OR head
  • Deep third degree burn of face AND/OR head with loss of body part
  • Deep third degree burn of face, head AND/OR neck
  • Deep third degree burn of face, head AND/OR neck with loss of body part
  • Deep third degree burn of forehead
  • Deep third degree burn of forehead
  • Deep third degree burn of forehead AND/OR cheek
  • Deep third degree burn of forehead AND/OR cheek with loss of body part
  • Deep third degree burn of lip
  • Deep third degree burn of nose
  • Deep third degree burn of scalp
  • Full thickness burn of lip
  • Full thickness burn of multiple sites of face, head or neck
  • Third degree burn of cheek
  • Third degree burn of cheek
  • Third degree burn of chin
  • Third degree burn of circumoral region
  • Third degree burn of ear
  • Third degree burn of forehead
  • Third degree burn of forehead
  • Third degree burn of forehead AND/OR cheek
  • Third degree burn of nose
  • Third degree burn of scalp

Index of Diseases and Injuries
References found for the code Z90.09 in the Index of Diseases and Injuries:


Information for Patients


Head Injuries

Also called: Cranial injuries, Skull fractures, Skull injuries

Chances are you've bumped your head before. Often, the injury is minor because your skull is hard and it protects your brain. But other head injuries can be more severe, such as a skull fracture, concussion, or traumatic brain injury.

Head injuries can be open or closed. A closed injury does not break through the skull. With an open, or penetrating, injury, an object pierces the skull and enters the brain. Closed injuries are not always less severe than open injuries.

Some common causes of head injuries are falls, motor vehicle accidents, violence, and sports injuries.

It is important to know the warning signs of a moderate or severe head injury. Get help immediately if the injured person has

  • A headache that gets worse or does not go away
  • Repeated vomiting or nausea
  • Convulsions or seizures
  • An inability to wake up
  • Dilated (enlarged) pupil in one or both eyes
  • Slurred speech
  • Weakness or numbness in the arms or legs
  • Loss of coordination
  • Increased confusion, restlessness, or agitation

Doctors use a neurologic exam and imaging tests to make a diagnosis. Treatment depends on the type of injury and how severe it is.

NIH: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

  • Head injury - first aid
  • Skull fracture


[Read More]

Neck Injuries and Disorders

Any part of your neck - muscles, bones, joints, tendons, ligaments, or nerves - can cause neck problems. Neck pain is very common. Pain may also come from your shoulder, jaw, head, or upper arms.

Muscle strain or tension often causes neck pain. The problem is usually overuse, such as from sitting at a computer for too long. Sometimes you can strain your neck muscles from sleeping in an awkward position or overdoing it during exercise. Falls or accidents, including car accidents, are another common cause of neck pain. Whiplash, a soft tissue injury to the neck, is also called neck sprain or strain.

Treatment depends on the cause, but may include applying ice, taking pain relievers, getting physical therapy or wearing a cervical collar. You rarely need surgery.

  • Cervical MRI scan
  • Cervical spine CT scan
  • Cervical spondylosis
  • Neck lump
  • Neck pain
  • Neck pain or spasms -- self care
  • Neck x-ray
  • Spinal fusion
  • Torticollis


[Read More]
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